Tag Archives: work-related learning

Lawyer in London: inspiring students through extra-curricular work-related learning activities

Teri-Lisa Griffiths & Jill Dickinson
@TerilisaCareers / @Jill_Dickinson1

Parallel session 2, Short paper 2.6

Listen to the presentation (opens in new window)

Short abstract
This paper focuses upon work-related, extra-curricular learning activities which have been designed and delivered in conjunction with a global employer, and analyses students’ engagement both with the activities themselves and their wider learning. In doing so, it evaluates collaborative methods between teaching staff, the Careers Service, and employers and their impact on students.

Back to event programme

Detailed outline
In recognition of current thinking that ‘targeting graduate employability skills… [is] not confined to career departments’, this paper utilises the example of the extra-curricular, Lawyer in London event to help illustrate effective, inter-professional collaboration between the careers service, teaching staff and an international law firm.
The event’s purpose was many-fold including: encouraging students to both reach their career potential and further invest within their course and developing both their confidence and also their familiarity with the working environment. The paper will also acknowledge the wider context of organisations recognising the need for greater diversity, particularly in the legal sector.
The initiative itself was inspired by the University’s developing relationship with Freshfields, as part of the Stephen Lawrence Scholarship Scheme.
With an overarching focus on the tripartite relationship between the university, employer and student, the paper outlines the practicalities of creating such pilot, extra-curricular schemes including: accessing funding, stakeholder-identification and emgagement and selecting/preparing students for the process.
Whilst the paper briefly outlines the event itself and the activities included, its main focus analyses and evaluates how the event met the team’s wider aims of encouraging student motivation, developing student employability and developing effective working methods between different stakeholders.
An important component comprised the feedback gained to help provide an insight into the viability, design and implementation of future events, and further development of the University’s relationships with external partners.
In outlining their conclusions, the authors suggest how others could utilise the idea of an inter-professional collaboration for the benefit of their own programmes and suggest how extra-curricular events may have a wider impact on students’ learning and career motivation.

Embedding skills and employability: a programme based approach

Tanya Miles-Berry, Nichola Cadet & Shawna McCoy
@thrmb / @nicholacadet

Parallel session 1, Short Paper 1.2

Listen to the presentation (opens in new window)

Short Abstract
Criminology students are supported to prepare for the jobs market both inter and extra-curricularly by integrating study skills over each academic year; scaffolding to reflect on their strengths and weaknesses, and utilising complex strategies to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills as they progress.
Work related learning was similarly embedded; on an extra-curricular basis from year 1, and within the curriculum through years 2 and 3.

Back to event programme
Detailed Outline
In order that students can gain the maximum benefit from their degree at SHU, we embedded a number of initiatives to support them during their study, and prepare them for the jobs market.

As well as integrating study skills more completely within their degree over each academic year, we also developed a scaffolding approach to ensure that once foundational knowledge is established a focus on teaching critical reflection as a key skill (Gibbs, 2013) encourages them to reflect on their strengths and weaknesses in relation to work related learning opportunities outlined below. Furthermore, this focus on ‘self’ (Hinchcliffe & Jolly, 2011) encouraged students to use more complex strategies to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills as they progress, whilst maintaining a focus on their future career aspirations (CSAP, 2009; McKinnon & McCrae, 2012).

This structured approach was also used to embed work related learning, with the aim that students would engage with work experience opportunities on an extra-curricular basis from year 1, and then use those opportunities within the curriculum through years 2 and 3. This holistic approach to work related learning opportunities encompasses a range of modules, from actual placements and ‘service learning’ (Deeley, 2010; Davies et al, 2014), to simulation, in an attempt to show the realities of related professions (Rockell, 2009) and extra-curricular opportunities offered through our annual Volunteer Fair (Stevenson & Clegg, 2011).

This session will look more closely at what was developed, how these developments work in practice, and changes that are in the process of being made as a result of our current revalidation process.

In addition, feedback from an independent evaluation of the simulation module at level 6 will be included, along with feedback from various employers and students involved in some of our initiatives, in order to evidence their perceptions and reflections.

REFERENCES
Davis, J, Cronley C, Madden E.E & Kim Y.K (2014) ‘Service-learning Use in Criminal Justice Education’. Journal of Criminal Justice Education 25: 2 157-174
Deeley S.J (2010) ‘Service-learning: Thinking outside the box’. Active Learning in Higher Education 11 (1): 43-53
Gibbs G (2013) ‘Reflections on the changing nature of educational development’. International Journal for Academic Development 18; 1 4 – 14
Hinchcliffe G.W & Jolly A (2011) ‘Graduate identity and employability’ British Educational Research Journal 37 (4) 563-584
McKinnon S & McCrae J (2012) ‘Closing the gap; preparing computing students for employment through embedding work-related learning in the taught curriculum’. Industry and Higher education 26 (4) 317 – 322
Rockell B.A (2009) ‘Challenging What they All Know: Integrating the Real/Reel World into Criminal Justice Pedagogy’. Journal of Criminal Justice Education 20 (1) 75-92
Stevenson J & Clegg S (2011) ‘Possible selves: students orientating themselves towards the future through extracurricular activity’. British Educational Research Journal 37 (2) 231-246

284 – Exploring ways of using formative feedback to improve student engagement with simulation modules – Vicky Thirlaway, Amy Musgrove

It is now well established that courses should seek to use Assessment for Learning, rather than Assessment of Learning, and that the form of assessment can have a significant impact on the student experience (the “backwash” effect described by Biggs (1996)). A key component of any assessment for learning strategy is to include authentic assessment tasks which the students can see have a relationship to the “real world” (McDowell, 2012; Gikandi et al., 2011). Fostering student engagement with a “make believe” scenario is a challenge: the activities must be perceived to be “credible” if students are going to engage with them.

Simulation can be an effective way of allowing students to contextualise their learning and develop the skills they will need to turn theory into practice. It can, therefore, have a role to play in developing employability skills.

Research demonstrates that formative assessment and feedback can significantly improve student performance (Black and Wiliam, 1998) and arguably, this is even more crucial when the assessment measures skills of application that the student may not have had to demonstrate in their previous educational experiences (Ramaprasad, 1983; Sadler, 1989 cited in Jordan, 2012).  Tutors often feel that students fail to engage with formative assessment, and take little notice of feedback provided (Orsmond et al., 2013).

This presentation will argue that cohorts of students are primarily strategic learners, and therefore are reluctant to engage with learning activities that do not directly feed into assessment, even where they acknowledge the validity of the exercise (Coles, 2009). It will be suggested that “formative” assessment should be compulsory and, therefore, must be part of the totality of summative assessment on the module. We have some experience of embedding compulsory formative assessment and feedback within a simulation exercise. The presentation will evaluate the successes and shortcomings of our experience, and consider alternative ways of providing formative feedback within the simulation whilst maintaining the authenticity of the task and the credibility of the summative assessment.

References

Biggs JB (1996) “Assessing learning quality: Reconciling institutional, staff and educational demands” Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 21: 5–16.

Black, P and Wiliam, D (1998) “Assessment and classroom learning” Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy and Practice” 5(1): 7-73

Cauley, K, M and McMillan, J. H (2010) “Formative Assessment Techniques to support student motivation and achievement” The Clearing House: A Journal of Educational Strategies, Issues and Ideas, 83:1, 1-6

Carless, D, D. Salter, M, Yang, and J. Lam. (2011) “Developing sustainable feedback practices” Studies in Higher Education 36, no. 4: 395–407.

Clark, I (2008) “Assessment is for Learning: Formative Assessment and Positive Learning Interactions” Florida Journal of Educational Adminsitration & Policy 2(1): 1-15

Clarke, I (2012) “Formative Assessment: Assessment is for self-regulated learning” Educ Psychol Rev, 24, 205-249

Coles, C (2009) “The Role of New Technology in Improving Engagement among Law Students in Higher Education”, Journal of Information, Law & Technology (JILT), 3, <http://go.warwick.ac.uk/jilt/2009_3/coles>

Duncan, N. (2007) “Feedforward’: Improving students’ use of tutors’ comments.” Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education 32, no. 3: 271–83.

Gikandi, J. W, Morrow, D and Davis, N. E (2011) “Online formative assessment in higher education: A review of the literature” Computers and Education, 57, 2333-2351

Handley, K, Price, M and Millar, J (2011) “Beyond ‘doing time’: Investigating the concept of student engagement with feedback” Oxford Review of Education, vol37, No.4, Aug 2011, 543-560

Jordan, S (2012) “Student engagement with assessment and feedback: Some lessons from short-answer free-text e-assessment questions” Computers and Education, 818-834

Mann, S.J. (2001) “Alternative perspectives on the student experience: alienation and engagement” Studies in Higher Education, 26(1): 7-19

McDowell, L. ‘Assessment for Learning’ in L. Clouder & Broughan (eds) (2012) “Improving Student Engagement and Development Through Assessment” London: Taylor & Francis

Orsmond, P, Maw, S, Park, S, Gomez, S & Crook, A. (2013): Moving feedback forward: theory to practice, Assessment & Evaluation in HigherEducation, 38:2, 240-252

Parkin, H. J, Hepplestone, S, Holden, G Irwin, B and Thorpe, L (2012) “A role for technology in enhancing students’ engagement with feedback” Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, Vo.37, No.8, Dec 2012, 963-973

Price, M, Handley, K and Millar, J (2011) “Feedback: Focusing attention on engagement.” Studies in Higher Education, Vol.36, No.8, Dec 2011, 879-896

Schartel, S. A (2012) “Giving Feedback: An integral part of education” Best Practice and Clinical Anaesthesiology, 26, 77-87

Wingate, U (2010) “The impact of formative feedback on the development of academic writing” Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, vol.35, No.5, Aug 2010, 519-533

284 Final power point SHU conference

254 – The development of a relationship centred community nursing programme – Patricia Day and Jill Gould

The specialist community nursing programmes were recently revalidated to meet the increasingly complex needs of clients in the community. Content was influenced by and in some instances pre-empted government policies based on client-centred care (DH 2010, DH 2011b, DH 2012). National agendas regarding children, families and the elderly highlight the demand for transformational nursing practitioners to lead services (DH 2011, DH 2013).

Research into effective interactions with clients has begun to change the face of health care. There is now less emphasis on advice giving and more on client autonomy, self-care and choice (DH 2012, DH 2012b). The new curriculum is based on the premise of ‘making every contact count’ (Cummings and Bennett 2012) and the latest evidence based approaches to engage with clients and work collaboratively with them. The programme innovatively meets the professional requirements for specialist practice (NMC 2001 and NMC 2004) through a skills based approach and the close connection between theory and practice. The spirit of motivational interviewing (Miller and Rollnick 2013) underpins the curriculum enabling students to work in partnership with clients in making lifestyle changes and to increase self-efficacy to optimize health outcomes.

A spiral curriculum means that the foundations of person-centred care and behaviour change taught in the first semester are built on in in the later stages of the programme. This includes exploration of complex client need and the leadership and teaching skills required to transform practice. The new programme has been delivered and positively evaluated by two student cohorts, with two further cohorts in progress. This session explores our experience of delivering the new programme and how a cohesive interdisciplinary delivery and spiral structure have contributed to excellent evaluations and high student achievement.

Cummings J and Bennett V (DH) (2012) Developing the culture of compassionate care: creating a new vision for nurses, midwives and care-givers

DH (2010) Liberating the NHS

DH (2011) Health Visitor Implementation Plan 2011–15

DH (2011b) The Operating Framework for the NHS in England 2012/13

DH (2012) Liberating the NHS: Developing the Healthcare Workforce From Design to Delivery

DH (2012b) Health Visitor Teaching in Practice: A Framework Intended for Use for Commissioning, Education and Clinical Practice of Practice Teachers (PTs)

DH – Department of Public Health Nursing (2013) Care in local communities – district nurse vision and model

Francis R (2013) Report of the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust Public Inquiry Executive summary TSO

Miller W and Rollnick S (2013) Motivational Interviewing New York Guilford Press

Nursing and Midwifery Council (2001) Standards for specialist education and practice

Nursing and Midwifery Council (2004) Standards of proficiency for specialist community public health nurses 

Presentation:  254 LTA conference presentation 2013 SCPHN and CSP

248 – An evaluation of the role of virtual support technologies in enhancing the student experience of work-related learning – Corina Bradbury

This presentation will report the findings from a Students’ as Researchers project centred around the engagement and disengagement of Level 6 Criminology students with virtual support technologies. The research aims to capture the students’ perspectives around the usefulness and applicability of the web 2.0 technologies in the form of blogs/journals, designed to aid the academic and professional development they gain from their participation in work related learning activities with various public, private and voluntary sector employers and organisations in and around South Yorkshire. Such organisations include South Yorkshire police and SOVA.

The project, funded and supported by Sheffield Hallam University “Students as Researchers scheme’, was conducted from a student-led approach by the Student Researcher, and supported and overseen by two staff members of the Criminology teaching team.

With the main researcher being a current student at the University, the objective was to obtain a clearer and more in-depth response around the students experience and attitude towards utilising these virtual technologies during their course progression. This presentation will highlight the initial qualitative findings of the project, gained from telephone interviews with two students and a focus group session with eight research participants. This will also discuss the perspective of the student researcher on her experiences and challenges involved with being in the student-researcher position.

The research findings will be used to inform improvements to the student experience and for potential future developments for the Criminology curriculum at Sheffield Hallam University.

248 corine bradbury Learning and teaching conference 2013-248 corina bradbury

 

243 – Creating and Manipulating Images using Maths and a Spreadsheet – Jeff Waldock

Experiential or active learning is a powerful mechanism for enhancing student motivation and engagement.  At one level it can demonstrate real-world applications of abstract theory, deepening and embedding understanding of it; at another it can represent realistic work-related learning. The mathematics programme at SHU is distinctive in the sector because in addition to developing subject-specific skills it focuses on developing real practical skills in applying mathematics, with graduates better prepared for the workplace.  This presentation will describe one specific mathematical modelling activity in which students research mathematical algorithms to implement a variety of effects on a digital photograph.  The mathematics involved can be very simple, such as using addition to brighten an image – or more advanced, requiring two dimensional calculus for sharpening an image. Students are very familiar with using spreadsheets, and therefore an Excel add-in has been developed which can take a digital image and import the individual pixel values into the worksheets of a workbook.  Existing skills can be used to carry out the necessary effects; the add-in provides a mechanism for recompiling a jpeg image from the worksheets. Because an image can be compiled directly from the worksheets, this paves the way for more creative use to be made of mathematical skills in generating images from scratch.  Students have found this to be a great way to explore their creative side – something rare in a mathematics programme.  Examples of images created using mathematics in this way will be shown, including the development of movies generated by running successive images together.  The experiences of a group of final year undergraduate students who have used the software will be described and some possible extensions and other applications explored.

Click to view presentation:  243 SHU_LTA_19June13_Digimages