Tag Archives: WBL

283 – Student partnerships and employability: case study of the Course Design Consultancy @ SHU – Manny Madriaga, Luci Cockayne, Andrew Squire, Lizzie Webster, Barbara Gonzalez Jaspe, Neil Morris & Chris Corker

This interactive workshop raises questions about the extent of our partnerships with students in their learning.  How are we ensuring that students are reflecting upon their own professional development in volunteering and/or work-based learning activities?   How transparent are we making the skills and attributes students are developing while working in partnership with academic staff? In pondering these questions, this workshop will include a show-and-share of how students and staff within the institution collaborated on a project to enhance student engagement in the curriculum design process this year.  This institutional initiative, Course Design Consultancy, was supported by the Higher Education Academy’s Students as Partners change programme, which is run in partnership with Birmingham City University.  This presentation highlights how both Venture Matrix™ students and Faculty Student Representatives from the Sheffield Business School were recruited to become course design consultants (CDCs).  It will describe the role of CDCs from students who have taken on this role.  The CDCs will share their experience of working with course leaders and course planning teams to first identify areas of improvement to inform course (re)development.  In addition, the CDCs will share their experience of working alongside their student peers and prepping, organising and running of ‘solution-based’ workshops to develop ideas for course improvement.  CDCs will discuss the work involved, particularly in producing CDC Reports which include recommendations based on student ideas taken from workshops.

303 – Developing a coherent and progressive approach to careers education in HE – Katharine Price Edwards & Shawna McCoy

The aim of this presentation is to share recent experience and best practice in providing a coherent and progressive careers education within the Criminology team at Sheffield Hallam University.  This will specifically be informed by the perspective of an MA Student on placement at Sheffield Hallam University as a Careers Guidance Practitioner and Associate Lecturer. The approach within Criminology this academic year has been holistic in the sense that we aimed to provide careers education on a number of different levels – careers management, self-identity, social identity, power, culture and hierarchy in society and in the work place, experiential learning, work-based learning, careers guidance as part of the curriculum, expansion of co-curricular activities, etc.   Trying to create and provide opportunities for student engagement has been extensive.  Our approach has also been inclusive, developing strong relationships with other specialist teams to promote student accessibility.  The challenge continues to be getting ALL students (or at least a majority) interested and engaged.   Student engagement and feedback has varied, and the presentation will reflect our achievements, our progress and areas for improvement, which will not only inform our approach going forward but explore how our lessons can be informed and inform other areas. The hope is that we can encourage an open discussion about the different approaches to careers education, learn and reflect on our experience, and promote the development of more coherent and progressive forms of careers education so that we can continue to ensure we provide an excellent student experience.

Visit the link to view the presentation:  303 Developing a coherent and progressive approach to careers

2012 Multiple experiences, multiple modes: engaging learners through the production of educational support resources

Cathy Malone, Oksana Fedotova, Melvyn Ternan, Helen Walmesley, Sam Dorrian, Nathan Elliss and Rachel Clarke

The co-lab is based on a recent collaboration between educational developers and academic staff  teaching on BA Animation, and a small-scale qualitative study evaluating this experience.  Using the preliminary research findings as a starting point, we shall consider the value of introducing audiovisual assessment methods into critical-theoretical modules.  Secondly, we shall consider the ways in which the University services can act as partners in pedagogic interventions, expanding students’ work-based learning opportunities and benefitting from their creative input.  The presentation will be illustrated by short screenings of student work.   

The use of multimedia teaching resources has been well documented, particularly in relation to  online tutorials and demonstrations (Sugar et al 2010).  Theories of multimedia learning suggest several advantages of mixed modality presentations (Moreno and Mayer 1999).  Addressing several modes at once (verbal, audio, visual) increases learner engagement, as well as acting as a welcome ‘just in time’  refresher   (Coutinho and Rocha 2010).    More recently,  there has been a shift towards student-produced digital artefacts,  underpinned  by the constructivist views of learning and the appreciation of the participatory nature of contemporary youth culture.  Acting as decision-makers, producers  and evaluators positions the learners at higher stages of Bloom’s taxonomy (Shafer 2010).  Kress et al (2001) argue that this process has a transformative nature, both due to the learner actively reshaping the available semiotic resources, and in terms of the resulting cognitive shifts.  

The first part of the presentation will focus on the curricular developments applying these ideas to a second-year module, traditionally dealing with theoretical texts and academic essay writing.   The second part of the paper describes the work the students undertook after the end of the module, for a number of University clients, including disabled student support, wellbeing, and study support. 

On presenting the preliminary research findings, the seminar participants will be invited to discuss the pedagogic challenges, operational and resource implications and their potential transferability outside media arts disciplines.  

 References

Coutinho, C. P. and Rocha, A. M. M. (2010) “Examining the use of educational video clips on distance education. “, SITE 2010 : Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, San Diego 

Kress, G., Jewitt, C., Ogborn, J. and Tsatsarelis, C. (2001) Multimodal Teaching and Learning: The Rhetorics of the Science Classroom, Continuum 

Moreno, R., and Mayer, R. E. (1999) “Cognitive principles of multimedia learning: The role of modality and contiguity effects”, Journal of Educational Psychology, 91, 

Shafer, K. G. (2010). “The proof is in the screencast”,  Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 10 (4) 

Sugar, W., Brown, A. and Luterbach, K. (2010). “Examining the anatomy of a screencast: Uncovering common elements and instructional strategies” The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 11 (3)

C5 – (EN50) 14.20

2012 iPhone feedback to develop student employability in sandwich engineering degrees

Anne Nortcliffe

Work based and placement learning opportunities have been recognised as a critical importance for future graduate employment, as a third of graduate posts are filled with students who have already worked for the organization, Highfliers (2011).    Placements have been a feature of the curriculum design for engineering courses for a number of Higher Education institutions since the 1960s, (Osbourne-Moss, 1968;Silver, 2007) .   However, the number of students undertaking placements are declining, Wilson (2012).  Equally modern recruitment processes require students to provide evidence of key competencies, though students do successfully develop these key competencies whilst on placement, Hall et al (2009), however in our experience at Sheffield Hallam University in the placement team; large employers are increasingly using techniques similar or the same as their graduate recruitment processes to filter the applications.    The employers require the engineering students to demonstrate in their placement applications a level of competency in key technical and employability skills.  Therefore any student employability development and feedback in engineering courses needs to provide appropriate support that continues to empower students to self identify, reflect, and articulate their relevant technical and employability skills for placement and graduate roles.   Is audio feedback via iPhone the solution to the problem and if yes, how effective is such approach?   What is the longitudinal effect of the feedback?  Do students continue to use the feedback in their final year?  This paper will present an example of an embedding iPhone feedback into computing and engineering courses and will provide critical analysis of the evidence from the qualitative and quantitive studies of the student reflections as to their perceptions of the impact of the audio feedback upon their employability and whether it has had a positive contributing factor in assisting them to secure a placement/graduate opportunity.

B8 – (FU09, EN25) 11.50

2012 What alternatives are available when placement opportunities are limited?

Chris Hill

CANCELLED

Facing a reduction in opportunities for direct placement experience, it is difficult to maintain a dissemination of that experience throughout Built Environment undergraduate cohorts. However, using student presentations of the learning outcomes individually identified with their experience can allow all students to gain a wide variety of current practices in their chosen field. The expectations of students on vocational courses includes a thorough preparedness to enter the ‘world of work’, the correlation with this from employers expectations brings employability to the centre of the curriculum. The divide between notional academic and work related realms is seen to be artificial: the academic work reflects the workplace; the workplace develops the academic disciplines. The opportunity to experience the variety of the workplace, from the professional practice in London to the Local Authority in Derbyshire, the subcontractor in Rotherham to the Olympics village project, is hugely valuable to the student. Few individuals, beyond the tutor, can hope to visit all these first hand, but by allowing the whole cohort to witness the presentations made by returning students, the whole cohort can be exposed to the experience, described from a first hand and student perspective. The variety of experiences presented helps all students, those who have gained experience and those who have not had that opportunity. This benefit is seen in development of interpersonal skills such as reflection and communication. 

Experience of undergraduate Built Environment disciplines in combining explicit links between learning outcomes and professional body requirements has maintained an academic and professional standard for this practice. Cumulative academic conference publication supports the scholarly nature of this work.

C1 – (EX04, EX13, EX15, EX18) 14.20