Tag Archives: screencasting

Use of video: thinking outside the lecture

Claire Cornock & Mike Robinson
@SHUMaths

Parallel session 4, CoLab 4.4

Short Abstract
Various staff in the Engineering and Mathematics department have been using videos to enhance their practice. This session will include discussion, demonstration and hands-on experience of different technologies that can be used to create videos along with several case studies of how they are being used in teaching.

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Detailed Outline
In this session, we aim to give staff enough knowledge, experience and confidence to start producing their own videos to enhance their teaching practice. To this end, the session will include:

• outline of the advantages and disadvantages of using videos in teaching brief case studies based on current use within the department, including how technology has been used to address particular problems

• presentation of the available technologies for producing videos, to include desktop PCs, tablet PCs, Android tablets, iPads, and more traditional whiteboard and cameras
• hands-on practice with a selection of the available technology.

The opportunity for colleagues to use the technology to start producing their own videos is the key part of this workshop, along with the opportunity to establish links between staff with shared interests. It is hoped that one outcome from this session will be an ongoing common-interest group for staff interested in using videos.

Several case studies will be presented within the session. These include:

• Addressing the problem of trying to teach how to use technology within a lecture room by creating short video examples. This was within a first year module that centred around the use of excel. Physical constraints of having a large group within a lecture room meant that students were struggling to carry out tasks shown in lectures. Now students make use of the short video examples in their own independent study time and more of the students are attempting the more technical tasks in assignments. The students often make unprompted comments on the usefulness of the videos.

• Videos of mathematical processes. Doing mathematics is a process which often requires correction, modification, and thought, and yet the finished product is typically concise and static, and much of the thinking is hidden (this is particularly true of any attempts which do not lead to a solution). In lectures the process of doing maths can be demonstrated, typically with speech describing the thought process, and writing recording the finished product. Students understandably struggle to keep notes on this without losing some important details. Videos offer an opportunity to provide students with a reference source in which both the thought process and the final product are recorded.

• Providing video feedback to students. Typical feedback on mathematical problems might include a set of model answers, but as with the mathematical processes above, these often lack detail about the thought processes behind the approach. Producing model solutions using screencasting can provide students with an audio commentary alongside the concise formal solution and has proved effective at engaging students.

Within these examples, several different types of technology have been used. These include PCs, tablet PCs, Android tablets and the traditional whiteboard and camera. We will discuss and demonstrate how some of these can be used.

300 – A Scaffolded Approach to Developing Professional Communication and Digital Skills – Sue Beckingham

The professional skills module for first year Computing students has followed a traditional approach not unlike many other subjects. However in one course a module reviewed the syllabus to integrate new digital skills to complement the programme. Students have undertaken a variety of digital communication tasks which they have reflected upon within their digital portfolio in the form of a blog. They have also worked in groups and held online meetings using Skype or Google+ hangouts, recording their meetings using a shared Google doc. A scaffolded approach using social media to develop communication skills has allowed students to reflect on existing skills and the development of new. Within their personal reflective blog the students embedded a digital ‘About Me’ video along with screencasts and screenshots to evidence their online group work. Not only has this helped them to develop new digital skills, they have been able to articulate how these may be of use in the workplace. The articulation of how professional skills can be applied and the confidence to do so is an important and vital aspect of their development.

300 A Scaffolded Approach to Developing Professional Communication and Digital Skills

269 – Does e-learning and mobile technology have a place within HE Learning, Teaching and Assessment? – Jo Marsden

Strand: The technology enhanced course Anticipated outcomes:• Discuss the viability & usefulness of iPads within LTA Session outline (or abstract): max 300 words Technology has brought about irreversible change to the world (Su 2009) and educators have had to acknowledge the reality of technologically-induced change and it’s constantly evolving pace.  This extreme growth in the capabilities of technology, especially mobile technology, alongside increasing affordability has led to the acknowledgement of a ubiquitous learning tool within higher education (Pollaro and Broussard 2011).   As non-traditional methods of education become more established and as a factor of that informal and flexible learning environments become necessary for students in an ever-connected society, e-learning will play a significant role (Fetaji 2008). Within this example e-learning has been utilised as a tool for:• student engagement• student learning• a teaching aid• assessment support This has been through the use of:• iPads• screencasting• online feedback• Google Docs• Google Forms   The views of the students, teaching staff and support staff have been collected on the use of these tools within different settings.   The outcomes from the students were positive in the use of different learning environments and technologies and assisted in student engagement, however there were questions raised over the impact on student learning.   The use of iPads for the purpose of assessment support assisted in achieving the new assessment regulations of a 3-week turnaround and in facilitating online student feedback, which was also favourably received.    The examples incorporated a blended approach to teaching and learning for isolated modules within the Department of Sport.   As technology usage within Higher Education becomes more prevalent and staff become more aware of the options, and also the ways in which to combine technology into the classroom, the real focus needs to shift to the course design and the integration of technology within this.

302 – Ownership of learning: students as producers of digital learning resources – Geir Petter Laingen

The paper presents preliminary results of the author’s PhD research into a specific innovative practice within the Dept of Media Arts at SHU, where students create digital learning resources in order to demonstrate the learning outcomes traditionally assessed by essay.  The produced resources are multimodal in nature, combining screen-capture, animation, text and audio in a single screencast that can be distributed online and potentially used by other learners.  The research draws on learning theories by Dewey (2011) and Mezirow (1991), conceptualising learning as a social communicative process, where information is not merely transmitted and absorbed, but must be appropriated and transformed by the learner.    The proliferation of digital media and technology in all areas of life has blurred the lines between producers and consumers, resulting in a more participatory culture with   low entry barriers, and strong sharing and support tendencies (Jenkins 2006, Kress 2010).  At the same time, it  led to increased debates  about the status of an ‘expert’ and  the ownership of learning, where the learners are taking care of their own needs and interests, and becoming “autonomous learners”  responsible for  “creating their own learning context and content”  (Haythornthwaite 2008, p 598).    In-depth interviews with the students provide their perspective on their involvement in the process, its benefits, challenges and the perceived impact on learning.   The paper will be accompanied by screening and discussion of several examples of student work.   Session activities for engagement:  The participants will be invited to view selected audiovisual examples and comment on their form, content, meaning, legitimacy and potential to be used as open educational resources.

Click on link to view presentation:  302 GP LTA 2013