Tag Archives: retention

Not just fun: The importance for social transition

Krassimira Teneva, Samantha Jane Logan &  Jess Inglis

Parallel session 1, Thunderstorm 1.1

Short Abstract
Research (Katanis, 2000) shows that students who do not make a successful social transition into university in the first year of study are less likely to persist. They are more likely to experience difficulties with their academic work and underachievement. This places more demands on academics to facilitate the students’ social transition as an integral part of the course delivery. This session will focus on ways you can make this happen, and on the help and support available from Student Support Services.

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Detailed Outline
In 2013-14 1446 students withdrew from the university without completing their course. They would have been affected by a number of issues (at SHU currently we haven’t got a robust process to record reasons for withdrawal) but research would suggest that failure to make friends, to feel that they belong to a community is likely to have contributed to the decision (Bers and Smith, 1991). Research (Kantanis, 2000; Urquhart & Pooley, 2007) also indicates that students who do not make a successful social transition into university in the first year of study are less likely to persist. They are more likely to experience difficulties with their academic work and underachieve. Lack of friendship networks can affect students’ self-esteem and confidence which hinders their ability to engage fully with the academic process (Thomas 2002; Tinto, 1998, 2000). The clear correlation between successful social transition and successful academic transition would indicate that academics and support staff need to do more to facilitate the students’ social transition as an integral part of the course delivery.

This session will focus on ways we can make this happen, and on the help and support available from Student Support Services. We will look at examples of projects which enhance the social experience of students, and enable them to develop friendship networks and learning communities, from SHU and other HEs

Bibliography:
• Kantanis, T. (2000). The role of social transition in students’ adjustment to the first-year of university. Journal of Institutional Research 9 (1), 100-110 http://www.aair.org.au/app/webroot/media/pdf/JIR/Journal%20of%20Institutional%20Research%20in%20Australasia%20and%20JIR/Volume%209,%20No.%201%20May%202000/Kantanis.pdf
• Tinto, V. (1998) Learning Communities and the Reconstruction of Remedial Education in Higher Education, Replacing Remediation in Higher Education Conference, Stamford University, Jan 26-27
• Tinto, V. (2000) Reconstructing the first year of college, in Student Support Services Model Retention Strategies for Two-year Colleges, Washington DC: Council for Opportunity in Education
• Thomas, L. (2002) ‘Student retention in Higher Education: the role of institutional habitus’, Journal of Educational Policy, Vol. 17, No. 4, pp. 423-32

On the day this session was merged with another session, as the themes overlapped. The details of that can be found here: Culture Connect: Engaging students through mentoring and supporting their transitions

253 – MoRKSS: black and minority ethnic student retention and success – Manny Madriaga, Farhana Ahmad, Alan Donnelly

This paper will feedback on an aspect of a Higher Education Academy (HEA) – funded project at Sheffield Hallam University called MoRKSS (Mobilisation of Research Knowledge for Student Success). Sheffield Hallam University is one of eight institutions in England funded by the HEA to seek interventions to address the issue, particularly with student engagement in mind. This project attempts to examine the issue of gap attainment between white and black minority ethnic (BME) students in the institution, where there is a difference in ‘good honours’ (first or 2.1) achievement in studying for first degrees. Nationally, the difference is 18.4% (Equality Challenge Unit 2011). This paper presentation will share preliminary findings from one aspect of this MoRKSS project, where a research instrument, informed by Kuh’s work on student engagement, has been employed to gauge social and academic integration of particular courses where there is a disproportionate amount of BME students (Sims 2007). Student researchers were recruited to partner in the research design, analysis of data and conduct one-to-one interviews with students on the courses of study. Given the sensitivity and significance of this project, this presentation will also be an opportunity for ‘student’ researchers to share their experiences of being a part of this endeavour. It is hoped that the research findings from this project will be mobilised to inform change within the institution, as well as ignite questions for the rest of the sector.  This paper covers two strands of this conference: supporting students and course identity.

2012 To INSPIRE: increasing intrapreneurial skills through pedagogy increases innovation, retention and employability

Heidi Probst, Angela Eddy, David Eddy, J Cumming and N Jones

In 2007 the UK National Radiotherapy Advisory Group report[1] to ministers indicated a dramatic revision of workforce provision was needed in order to meet the objectives of the NHS cancer plan. Intrapreneurship (an individual intention or drive to innovate within an organization[2]) is relevant to these roles but the development of skills for enterprising activity is rarely attended to in health care training.

The aim of this study was to develop an intrapreneurial enhanced pedagogy for oncology practitioners studying at Master level.

Method

Stage 1 involved a qualitative investigation of identified intrapreneurs working within Radiation Therapy to identify the factors that contributed to their intrapreneurial development. Grounded Theory methodology was used and seven individual interviews were undertaken with data saturation occurring at interview 5. Sampling was purposive and interview data was enhanced by a review of the literature on intrapreneurial education. Member-checking, peer de-briefing and reflexivity were used to enhance trustworthiness and authenticity of the data.
Four key concepts were identified from the interviews; self- efficacy, intrapreneurial strategies, intrapreneurial learning, and organisational emphasis on intrapreneurialism.

A review of the literature complemented this data collection stage resulting in a theoretical model of the path to intrapreneurialism in Radiation Therapists; this formed the basis of an online pedagogy for a PG module on breast cancer radiotherapy to enhance intrapreneurial skills and improve services to patients.
Conclusions
Integrating innovation into specialist health modules is possible using the intrapreneurial pedagogy developed. However, it is not without challenges and an acceptance that not all students will benefit from this approach or see the need or relevance for intrapreneurial activity. 

This presentation will allow delegates to consider the benefits and challenges of using an intrapreneurial pedagogy through the experience of this small research project. Sharing some of the unexpected student outcomes will highlight the benefits of this pedagogical approach.

 
Reference List

  (1)   National Radiotherapy Advisory Group. Radiotherapy: developing a world class service for England (Report to Ministers).  2007.
  (2)   Amo B, Kolvereid L. ORGANIZATIONAL STRATEGY, INDIVIDUAL PERSONALITY AND INNOVATION BEHAVIOR. Journal of Enterprising Culture 2005 Mar;13(1):7-19.

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