Tag Archives: partnership

3.7 Transcending Modularity through Flexible Formative Feedback

3.7 Hallam L&T Conference Session 3-7 – Oli Johnson

What is the role of feedback in promoting learning across modules and how can feedback be embedded more effectively into the student journey? The HEA-funded Flexible Formative Feedback Project is led by a team of Student Ambassadors for Learning and Teaching (SALT)—a nationally-recognised student-staff partnership scheme in which teams of students design and lead on learning and teaching enhancement activities. Working in collaboration with students and staff in a cross-section of ten departments, the project team are constructing a feedback profile of existing practice and mapping student experiences onto the feedback environments of their disciplinary areas. Data will be used to identify case studies of best practice and to inform the development of discipline-specific tools for the provision, collation and use of feedback that is both flexible—i.e. adaptable to disciplinary and individual student needs—and formative—i.e. action-oriented and developmental.

As a longitudinal study, the project will revisit students over the course of the academic year to find out the extent to which their expectations have been met by the feedback process. Although data collection is ongoing, our initial consultation has identified a ‘feedback gap’ between student expectations and experiences, the fault lines of which appear early at level one. This paper, which will be presented by a staff-student team, will share the initial findings of the project and explore strategies to narrow this gap including the development of study skills training packages and feedback collation tools. It will consider the underdeveloped role of feedback as a synoptic learning tool with the potential to transcend the modular nature of assessment as part of a broader transition to self-regulated learning. It will conclude with a reflection on the implications of this process for the future-proofing of feedback in the context of rapid technological development and the changing university environment.

2012 Embedding enterprise within the curriculum: researching staff perspectives

Kirsty Grant, Katie Hook and Sheila Quairney

The aim of this study is to explore notions of enterprise within Higher Education (HE) through exploration of lecturers’ perspectives. Enterprise can be defined as the application of creative ideas and innovations to practical situations; it is a generic concept that can be applied across all areas of education. 

Within a HE setting, learning can take place without bearing the label of ‘enterprise’. Enterprise education is concerned with the process of how students learn rather than what they learn. It aims to produce graduates who possess the mind-set and the skills to come up with innovative ideas in response to identified needs, and the ability to act on them. 

In light of the rising tuition fees and increasing unemployment rates for UK graduates, there is greater focus on the responsibility of universities to develop the employability skills of their students. The relevance of enterprise education has been highlighted in The Wilson Review (2012) which called for universities to play an integral role in developing students’ enterprising skills.  Therefore, universities will need to examine their current provision for enterprise education and as a result, work towards equipping academic staff with the skills they need to deliver this.  

The aim of this study is to ascertain what involvement academic staff, at Sheffield Hallam University, perceive that they should have in sharing notions of enterprise with their students.  Secondly, to explore the perspectives of academic staff on how enterprise might be developed within the curriculum to support employability.          

In order to answer the study’s aims, 35 semi-structured interviews have been conducted at Sheffield Hallam University. Participants were recruited through a convenience sample of lecturers, across faculties. Emerging themes have been identified through a thematic analysis of the data. 

The preliminary results of the research provide insight into the barriers academic staff have faced when including enterprise within their teaching. These results will provide an opportunity to discover examples of effective practice in order to assist academic staff to deliver their subject expertise in a more enterprising way.  From this strategies for embedding enterprise into the curriculum, in order to enhance graduate employability, will be explored.

Click link for presentation:  Embedding enterprise within the curriculum: researching staff perspectives

A6 – (FU33 and FU39) 11.00

2012 Practitioner partnership model delivers transformative student learning experience

Chris Cutforth, Steve Wood, Val Stevenson and students

This session will highlight an innovative learning and teaching approach involving a partnership between an academic and an industry practitioner to deliver a post-graduate sport module which focuses on strategic thinking, planning and management skills. 

Along with the more traditional module learning outcomes, the goal has been to enable students to think differently and to help create ‘leaders of the future’.  

Chris Cutforth, Senior Lecturer in Sport, and Steve Wood, a freelance corporate and personal coach, whose specialities include business excellence, coaching and corporate theatre, have worked together to create a learning experience which challenges traditional sports industry thinking and practice, combining relevant academic content with generic leading edge principles, practices, tools and techniques. 

The module has been delivered using various innovative approaches including role play, coaching, action learning, case studies, visualisation, goal-setting and motivation exercises, along with more traditional teaching approaches. Together these have created a stimulating learning environment and a transformative learning experience for the students.

Feedback on the module has been extremely positive with a significant number of the students stating that it has equipped them with additional knowledge, skills and confidence to initiate and lead strategic developments within their organisations, and in other organisations in the future. Students also stated that the combined input from academic and practitioner significantly added value to the learning experience.   

 Following the success of the module, discussions are planned with the new professional institute for sport and physical activity to align the curriculum to the Institute’s recently launched professional development framework. 

The session will be delivered by Chris Cutforth, supported by additional contributions from Steve Wood, some of the students, and Val Stevenson, the course leader and Employability Lead for the Sport department, who will place the approach adopted for this module into a broader employability and professional development context.

Presentation:  A7 EN17 LTA conference presentation

A7 – (EN17, EN26, EN27, EN29) 11.00

2012 Embedding innovative practice: employers as partners in ensuring graduate employability

Tanya Miles-Berry and Nicola Cadet

Criminology has run two successful Employability Fairs, with a third planned for September. This has been assisted with embedding work related learning into our new Programme, and a number of initiatives are now being impacted as a direct result. 

This paper will outline the function of the Fair, how this has provided a number of different learning opportunities for our students to enhance experience and evidence graduate attributes through proactive and meaningful engagement with employers across the sector. 

We offer 2 modules, one at level 5 and one at level 6 where volunteering and employment roles attract credit through space being created for work related activities, complemented with face to face teaching around making links between practice, theory, academic knowledge and reflection to assess their learning and understanding of the volunteer opportunity they have undertaken. 

We also offer simulation modules which have been devised in collaboration with outside agencies, with the whole module, from design, to implementation and assessment being tailored to the graduate attributes identified by employers in our sector. 

The links with Practitioners through the Employability Fair proved useful, in opening opportunities for volunteering and placements in the first instance, with an additional event planned for the Practitioners themselves to identify further opportunities for our students.  

The paper will conclude that staff skills required to broker and foster such relationships are as critical as the skills being developed by students themselves.  Furthermore, the employer offer has to be explicit and transparent.  

It is our contention that ‘Employability Fairs’ can be emulated across the University and once these relationships have been established, further opportunities for collaboration will follow. These opportunities can be developed on a Departmental level and will not necessarily follow the model that we have outlined. 

A number of barriers to success have been established: 

Firstly, as a University wide Agenda, there is a danger that specific agencies may be over saturated with requests due to both duplication and a lack of awareness that an agency has already become involved. This in turn may endanger the initial relationship which has been established and lead to that relationship breaking down. 

Secondly, a number of organisations/individuals may become involved with a specific subject group – even though there is clear potential for cross-departmental or even cross-faculty involvement particularly across joint programmes. 

If we are to encourage true collaboration across both Department and Faculty, we need to ensure that a working policy is devised in order that the relationships which are cultivated on an individual basis are not jeopardised in our quest to secure work based learning opportunities for our students across the University. 

Furthermore, we will argue that fundamental to this policy is the need to ensure that a specific individual is identified within each Department, who will meet across Faculty to ensure that the policy can be developed and sustained.

Click to presentation:  Embedding innovative practice: employers as partners in ensuring graduate employability

A2 – (FU10) 11.00