Tag Archives: online

Subverting Multiple-choice Questions for Deep Learning

Lee-Ann Sequeira

Parallel session 3, CoLab 3.6

Short Abstract
The aim of this workshop is to show through examples and evidence how online formative multiple-choice questions (MCQs) can be used to promote conceptual understanding and peer learning for students studying in and away from the classroom.

By the end of the workshop, participants would have:
• Understood how formative MCQs can be used to promote deep learning in face-to-face and distance learning
• Completed a short online formative MCQ quiz to see how it works from a participant’s perspective
• Begun to construct an online formative MCQ quiz

Back to event programme

Detailed Outline
An online formative MCQ has key features that distinguish it from a traditional MCQ that is used to test recall of information.

• The topic for the MCQ should be complex and difficult to understand. It should be fundamental to that field/module, such that it is a conceptual building block on which more advanced concepts are built (eg. threshold concepts).
• As the aim is to further the learner’s understanding, it is advisable to create a set of MCQs – about five-eight MCQs – on a single topic that explore different aspects of that topic and/or increase in complexity.
• Similar to traditional MCQs, formative MCQs have a question stem, correct answer(s) and distractors. Distractors (incorrect options) are key as they help to identify areas of confusion or poor understanding.
• MCQs can have varying levels of pre-programmed, automatic feedback, for example, referring students to a particular topic in the text or explaining certain problematic parts of the question or inviting them to attend a mop-up tutorial to discuss problematic areas identified in the MCQs.
• MCQs are often created in a virtual learning environment (VLE) which tracks the learners’ responses and generates reports showing the learners’ attempts by question, user, overall class performance, etc. in real time. These metrics can be used by the tutor to diagnose which questions or topics the students are finding problematic and accordingly focus her/his efforts in that direction.
• Learning activities such as online discussion fora and webinars can be used to explain and clarify issues identified in the MCQs (determined by the metrics) and increases opportunities for learners to ask follow-up questions and discuss them, thereby advancing the learner’s understanding.

In this way, online formative MCQs are compatible with a variety of pedagogical purposes – peer learning, the flipped classroom, self-assessment and revision, etc. Examples and evidence will be presented from a number of disciplines – economics, health sciences, physics, education, etc., including feedback from students and staff who are involved in a pilot study.

This is the proposed outline for the CoLab session:
• Introduction to MCQs
(Types and features of MCQs, merits and limitations)
• Quiz time!
(Participants take an MCQ quiz to get an idea of how it works from a student’s perspective)
• Hands-on activity: DIY MCQ
(Participants begin constructing an MCQ quiz using the guidance provided.)

Reflections from an alternative chalkface: Evaluating the Enhancing Prostate Cancer Care MOOC

David Eddy
@sonofedd

Parallel session 1, Short Paper 1.3

Short Abstract
Following completion of the evaluation of the EPCCMOOC, this presentation will share and disseminate key findings in terms of lessons learned, impact on existing provision, implications for future delivery and considerations for the institution.

Back to event programme

Detailed Outline
Following a detailed evaluation of design, planning and delivery of the Enhancing Prostate Cancer Care MOOC , this presentation will share and disseminate key findings from the 1st MOOC delivered by SHU in collaboration with the Prostate Cancer UK charity and PebblePad.
This was a powerful learning experience for the EPCC MOOC course team, who embarked upon this with a number of objectives:

  • To help raise awareness of and engagement with issues around Prostate Cancer and the patient pathway
  • To determine whether our pedagogical approach to online DL delivery could remain effective at scale
  • To ascertain the affordances presented by utilising PebblePad’s personal learning space to deliver a MOOC
  • To raise awareness of the SHU portfolio of online DL and CPD Anywhere provision
  • To test a range of approaches to delivery and (new to us) software and tools and explore their potential for our ‘business as usual’ delivery
  • To explore the potential for aggregating CPD activity to allow participants to submit APEL claims from EPCCMOOC for credit.

During the presentation I will share key findings in terms of lessons learned, impact on existing provision, implications for future delivery and considerations for the institution.

262 – Building an online course identity: an example from a post graduate course in occupational therapy – Susan Elizabeth Walsh

Strand: Course Identity

The MSc Occupational Therapy (post graduate) course is delivered entirely online using Blackboard VLE.  Although online learning can have advantages for students in  allowing more flexibility across distance and time (Helbers et al 2005) and possibilities for different styles of communication (Casimiro et al 2009), the development of an online course identity can be problematic in the absence of the usual physical and visual cues available in classroom learning (Murphy 2004). We encouraged the development of an online course identity from the start in a number of ways: identifying students’ own learning needs and aspirations to build a sense of personal commitment to the course; recognising and valuing students personal, academic and professional contributions to build social cohesion and commitment to each other and introducing students to the wider academic and support team in the faculty to create a sense of belonging to a vibrant academic learning community. With an e-learning technologist, we developed a range of creative and interactive e-learning resources and activities to use in the two week induction period and the first module of the course. We utilised Salmon’s 5 stage model of online learning (Salmon 2004), in particular the ‘access and motivation’ and ‘online socialisation’ stages, to structure the e-learning resources and activities.

.The anticipated outcomes of this presentation are to:

  • Evaluate a range of e-learning resources and activities used during the induction and first module of the course in promoting course identity.
  • Apply pedagogical theory, in this case Salmon’s 5 stage model of online learning, to underpin the way that e-learning resources and activities are utilised.
  • Consider the wider relevance of the approach to other post-graduate courses.

The session will include demonstration of some of the e-learning resources and activities and how these contributed to the formation of course identity.

 References:

Helbers, D, Rossi, D, Hinton, L (2005) ‘Students use of an on-line learning environment: Comparisons of group usage within a first year Health Communications course’, Student in Learning, Evaluation, Innovation and Development, 2 (1) P 20-33

Casimiro, L.  (2009) ‘Grounding theories of W(e)Learn: A framework for online interprofessional education’, Journal of Interprofessional Care, 23(4), pp 390-400

Murphy, E. (2004) ‘Recognising and promoting collaboration in an online asynchronous discussion’, British Journal of Educational Technology, 15 (4)

Salmon, G. ( 2004). E-moderating: The key to teaching and learning online. London and New York: Taylor and Francis.

2012 Think about using quizzes

Hugh Lafferty and Keith Burley

The use of quizzes should be preceded by many questions, especially about whether the quizzes are valid.

Are quizzes composed solely of Yes/No questions valid?

Are quizzes composed solely of 4-option Multiple Choice questions valid?

Are quizzes composed solely of 5-option Multiple Choice  questions valid?

Link to presentation:   Think about using quizzes

B5 – (EN14, EN02, EN07) 11.50