Tag Archives: inspiration

Lawyer in London: inspiring students through extra-curricular work-related learning activities

Teri-Lisa Griffiths & Jill Dickinson
@TerilisaCareers / @Jill_Dickinson1

Parallel session 2, Short paper 2.6

Listen to the presentation (opens in new window)

Short abstract
This paper focuses upon work-related, extra-curricular learning activities which have been designed and delivered in conjunction with a global employer, and analyses students’ engagement both with the activities themselves and their wider learning. In doing so, it evaluates collaborative methods between teaching staff, the Careers Service, and employers and their impact on students.

Back to event programme

Detailed outline
In recognition of current thinking that ‘targeting graduate employability skills… [is] not confined to career departments’, this paper utilises the example of the extra-curricular, Lawyer in London event to help illustrate effective, inter-professional collaboration between the careers service, teaching staff and an international law firm.
The event’s purpose was many-fold including: encouraging students to both reach their career potential and further invest within their course and developing both their confidence and also their familiarity with the working environment. The paper will also acknowledge the wider context of organisations recognising the need for greater diversity, particularly in the legal sector.
The initiative itself was inspired by the University’s developing relationship with Freshfields, as part of the Stephen Lawrence Scholarship Scheme.
With an overarching focus on the tripartite relationship between the university, employer and student, the paper outlines the practicalities of creating such pilot, extra-curricular schemes including: accessing funding, stakeholder-identification and emgagement and selecting/preparing students for the process.
Whilst the paper briefly outlines the event itself and the activities included, its main focus analyses and evaluates how the event met the team’s wider aims of encouraging student motivation, developing student employability and developing effective working methods between different stakeholders.
An important component comprised the feedback gained to help provide an insight into the viability, design and implementation of future events, and further development of the University’s relationships with external partners.
In outlining their conclusions, the authors suggest how others could utilise the idea of an inter-professional collaboration for the benefit of their own programmes and suggest how extra-curricular events may have a wider impact on students’ learning and career motivation.