Tag Archives: digital media

300 – A Scaffolded Approach to Developing Professional Communication and Digital Skills – Sue Beckingham

The professional skills module for first year Computing students has followed a traditional approach not unlike many other subjects. However in one course a module reviewed the syllabus to integrate new digital skills to complement the programme. Students have undertaken a variety of digital communication tasks which they have reflected upon within their digital portfolio in the form of a blog. They have also worked in groups and held online meetings using Skype or Google+ hangouts, recording their meetings using a shared Google doc. A scaffolded approach using social media to develop communication skills has allowed students to reflect on existing skills and the development of new. Within their personal reflective blog the students embedded a digital ‘About Me’ video along with screencasts and screenshots to evidence their online group work. Not only has this helped them to develop new digital skills, they have been able to articulate how these may be of use in the workplace. The articulation of how professional skills can be applied and the confidence to do so is an important and vital aspect of their development.

300 A Scaffolded Approach to Developing Professional Communication and Digital Skills

182 – Audio Feedback – one size does not fit all – Michelle Denise Blackburn & Claire Taylor

Strand:                        Technology Enhanced Course

The National Student Survey (NSS) (2012) indicates less than 60% of students perceive their feedback as prompt, detailed and offering sufficient clarification to support understanding.  This is challenging news for HE institutions and course leaders, particularly as NSS scores could influence course recruitment.  As a consequence institutions and academics have sought to deliver improvements on the feedback process and one method used to achieve this has been audio feedback.  As with most learning and teaching innovations there has been a subsequent flurry of research into the ‘student’ experience of audio feedback.  This study looked beyond the notion of the generic ‘student’ and sought to establish how audio feedback impacted on different learner groups:  mature students, traditional undergraduates and those with learning difficulties.  This session will share the results of this research and the experience of academics delivering audio feedback.  Fundamentally it will address the following two questions:

  • How should we approach audio feedback for different learner groups?
  • What is stopping us from routinely using audio feedback?

182 SHU conference presentation

302 – Ownership of learning: students as producers of digital learning resources – Geir Petter Laingen

The paper presents preliminary results of the author’s PhD research into a specific innovative practice within the Dept of Media Arts at SHU, where students create digital learning resources in order to demonstrate the learning outcomes traditionally assessed by essay.  The produced resources are multimodal in nature, combining screen-capture, animation, text and audio in a single screencast that can be distributed online and potentially used by other learners.  The research draws on learning theories by Dewey (2011) and Mezirow (1991), conceptualising learning as a social communicative process, where information is not merely transmitted and absorbed, but must be appropriated and transformed by the learner.    The proliferation of digital media and technology in all areas of life has blurred the lines between producers and consumers, resulting in a more participatory culture with   low entry barriers, and strong sharing and support tendencies (Jenkins 2006, Kress 2010).  At the same time, it  led to increased debates  about the status of an ‘expert’ and  the ownership of learning, where the learners are taking care of their own needs and interests, and becoming “autonomous learners”  responsible for  “creating their own learning context and content”  (Haythornthwaite 2008, p 598).    In-depth interviews with the students provide their perspective on their involvement in the process, its benefits, challenges and the perceived impact on learning.   The paper will be accompanied by screening and discussion of several examples of student work.   Session activities for engagement:  The participants will be invited to view selected audiovisual examples and comment on their form, content, meaning, legitimacy and potential to be used as open educational resources.

Click on link to view presentation:  302 GP LTA 2013