Tag Archives: design

Ready, Steady, Learn!

Dr David Smith & Dr Graham Holden
@dave_thesmith / @GrahamJHolden

Parallel session 4, CoLab 4.1

This workshop builds on a session devised and developed by Graham, and Professor Ranald Macdonald which then ran with academic staff at the University of Manchester.

Short Abstract
Come teach with us, share your practice and add a little bit of flavour to your teaching. Participants will be asked to design or redesign a teaching session. We’ll award points to all the sessions and feedback to develop further ideas and implementation. At the end of the workshop the session with the most points wins a tasty teaching prize.

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Detailed Outline
We believe that good learning experiences are challenging, risky, unpredictable, experimental, and are, above all, fun! These experiences occur individually as well as in groups, and everyone brings different knowledge, skills and experiences to the table.
In this workshop we will explore the metaphor of cooking in teaching and learning (hence the title) as this incorporate features that make learning more engaging. Learning, like food, can become dull and bland and the addition of an extra ingredient or combining ingredients in a different way can transform the experience. These changes don’t have to mean a complete redesign of the learning experience but can be about adding an extra dimension at the right time. Like any good meal it is the combination of a well-planned menu, good quality ingredients and the skill of the cook that makes the difference.

This session will explore the key elements of active learning and quality design of the learning experience; we will share ideas and techniques that promote engagement. We will do this be drawing on principles for active learning, our own experiences and examples from the University’s Inspirational Teachers. The best experiences, though, are those of the participants, so we ask you to come prepared to explore your own practices and to share your reflections with others. By the end of the session we will have a collection of recipes for engaged student learning and the beginnings of what we hope will be an active learning cookbook.

264 – Navigation should be intuitive: Designing a blackboard site using website principles – Emma Taylor

There has been an increased development of distance learning courses in the Occupational Therapy and Vocational Rehabilitation subject group with Blackboard being the main learning platform.   Blackboard however can be awkward to use and learning materials can often be found in folders that involve a degree of navigation on the students’ part.  Learning how to use systems such as Blackboard, however, has been found to be a drawback of using such systems (Bradford et al 2006).  To help alleviate this, the module Health Ergonomics in the Workplace has been developed to make the navigation process easier for the students with all material accessible with no more than two clicks. Quick links are provided to some of the more deeply embedded tools to reduce the need for students to search in the learning material. The use of pictures has also been used make the site more attractive.
This poster illustrates the Blackboard site and will hopefully promote discussion around its use, how it could be enhanced further and how the principles can be used in other distance learning modules.

264 LTA poster

2012 Virtual meeting and tutorial spaces

Melanie Levick-Parkin

Design is traditionally a studio-based subject and thus design education has also always centred around the physical creative space. This space has not just been important for the physical production of things, but as a joint thinking space. Modern Universities room utilisation systems and hourly based timetabling have made the time and space available for traditional studio teaching very sparse and the issue affects subjects far beyond the studio culture of art & design. 

This problem is not unique to the design discipline, because many subjects have at their core creative processes, which need mental space to flourish and make joint physical space desirable.

To the uninitiated any creative process can seem quite unproductive and unfocused at times, and it is sometimes difficult to argue for the need to have space for students to just be in and for teachers to drop in on.

So teaching and contact has had to become very focused and compartmentalised and all other activities such as production and ‘creative idling’ have to be taken elsewhere.

This creates a physical and mental distance between the teachers, the students and their peers, and severely limits the times and spaces in which feedback or exchange can occur. 

Is it possible to use the digital realm to create spaces where this contact can take place in a more responsive, organic way, more sympathetic to the creative process? Will students participate and take advantage of the space and the extra contact offered and will it have an impact on their achievement and learning experience? With Case study example to discuss

D7 – (EN56, EN11, EN22, EN28) 15.30

2012 Embedding enterprise within the curriculum: researching staff perspectives

Kirsty Grant, Katie Hook and Sheila Quairney

The aim of this study is to explore notions of enterprise within Higher Education (HE) through exploration of lecturers’ perspectives. Enterprise can be defined as the application of creative ideas and innovations to practical situations; it is a generic concept that can be applied across all areas of education. 

Within a HE setting, learning can take place without bearing the label of ‘enterprise’. Enterprise education is concerned with the process of how students learn rather than what they learn. It aims to produce graduates who possess the mind-set and the skills to come up with innovative ideas in response to identified needs, and the ability to act on them. 

In light of the rising tuition fees and increasing unemployment rates for UK graduates, there is greater focus on the responsibility of universities to develop the employability skills of their students. The relevance of enterprise education has been highlighted in The Wilson Review (2012) which called for universities to play an integral role in developing students’ enterprising skills.  Therefore, universities will need to examine their current provision for enterprise education and as a result, work towards equipping academic staff with the skills they need to deliver this.  

The aim of this study is to ascertain what involvement academic staff, at Sheffield Hallam University, perceive that they should have in sharing notions of enterprise with their students.  Secondly, to explore the perspectives of academic staff on how enterprise might be developed within the curriculum to support employability.          

In order to answer the study’s aims, 35 semi-structured interviews have been conducted at Sheffield Hallam University. Participants were recruited through a convenience sample of lecturers, across faculties. Emerging themes have been identified through a thematic analysis of the data. 

The preliminary results of the research provide insight into the barriers academic staff have faced when including enterprise within their teaching. These results will provide an opportunity to discover examples of effective practice in order to assist academic staff to deliver their subject expertise in a more enterprising way.  From this strategies for embedding enterprise into the curriculum, in order to enhance graduate employability, will be explored.

Click link for presentation:  Embedding enterprise within the curriculum: researching staff perspectives

A6 – (FU33 and FU39) 11.00