What are your work values and why are they important?

Values are qualities considered to be the most important guiding principles that help set priorities in your career and life. They are highly personal and define what is purposeful and meaningful to you. Though values may change in response to life circumstances, they are generally thought to be enduring and provide a compass for setting goals and making decisions.

Identifying your values can help you identify what activities and environment you might enjoy working in, focus your career aims and understand the motivators that might drive your career choice

Would earning a lot of money make you happy? Despite the phrase, “money makes the world go around” it generally doesn’t lead to job satisfaction. It’s important to consider what you enjoy and what you want from a career while thinking about your future.

Values are the things that are really important to you. They are also the things which are important to organisations and you may see them proclaimed on websites. Many organisations are beginning to recruit people who seem to have values which are in line with theirs.

Here are some examples of things you may value:- Creativity – Autonomy – Justice – Fun – Achievement – Using skills – Continuous learning – Security – Work-Life balance – Money – Status

Some values are likely to be more important to you than others so that, for example, you may be willing to sacrifice ‘security’ in a job for ‘creativity’.

Finding a job which suits you can help to give you job satisfaction and feel happier.

Imagine going to work every day and feeling proud of what you achieve. You are doing something that is important to you and you strongly believe it is worthwhile. You feel at home in your workplace and it’s as if the job were made just for you.

Faith, Hope and (working for a) Charity….. 

Eddie Smith  BSc Mathematics graduate shares his experience of looking for a role in the third sector

As a Christian, I believe that God has called me to leave a positive impact on the world. It is my belief that this calling applies in all aspects of my life, and so when looking for and applying for graduate jobs, it was important to me that this should reflect these values. I decided to focus my search on the third sector. Christians Against Poverty was a charity I had been aware of for a while, and so one day I went onto their website to see if they had any vacancies. It was then that I first heard about their internship and upon application I was successful.

The internship first appealed to me because it will give me valuable experience in an innovative charity (which has made numerous appearances on lists of best charities to work for) and will set me in good stead for a career in the third sector which is my ultimate goal. An internship role rather than a regular job attracted me because of the additional support that will be available throughout the year. This is important to me because I am aware that the leap between full-time study and the working world is large and is something I am somewhat apprehensive about. The goal of Christians Against Poverty is to free people in the UK from the grip of poverty and debt. I will be working as an intern in the Debt Operations team, putting together payment plans and negotiating repayments. This role will enable me to use the skills developed as part of my mathematics degree, whilst helping people and making a positive impact on the lives of those most in need.”

Eddie commences as a graduate intern with Christians Against Poverty on September 3rd.

To explore your values why not have a go at an online questionnaire

 

 

My first week on placement!

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Blog post by Psychology student Georgia Widdowson – my first week on a work placement in the Careers and Employability Centre…

A bit about me…

I’ve always loved people, I love chatting with them, listening to them, but most of the time, talking at them. That is why I decided Psychology was the perfect course for me; the study of human behaviour never fails to get me excited!

During the open day for Sheffield Hallam, I was instantly attracted to the course once it was stated that we had the option of doing a work placement .I thought “Fab, a chance to get out into the real world and explore what a field in Psychology has to offer!” As a fantasist, I always envisaged I’d end up pulling a Freud and being a counsellor for the 8 weeks, or taking a leaf out of Milgram’s or Zimbardo’s book and conducting some crazy experiments. However, although it has not been as juicy as this, that’s not to say, I haven’t already learnt a lot during my work placement so far!   

So, where am I doing my work placement?

Originally, I was assigned to work at a sexual health charity in Sheffield. I was really looking forward to this as it covered one of the many areas within Psychology of interest to me. So, I thought “Amazing, for once, things have actually worked out for me!” Well…I spoke to soon. A couple of days later, when enjoying a nice Jacket potato in the Heart of the campus café, I received an email stating that a change in circumstances within the organisation meant I could no longer carry out my placement there. So, after one of my classic dramatic and blubbery phone calls to my Mum (and in front of the unfortunate souls who happened to be in the café) I concluded that this was down to fate, and that I had to trust that it was meant to be!

So, to get to the point…thankfully, the lovely and friendly careers team at Sheffield Hallam said they’d take me on, and as such I was assigned to work in their team for 8 weeks.

Now, I am sure you’re all wondering. How has my first week been?

As my first day arrived, I woke up at 7am, blurry eyed and zombified, and feeling very nervous and anxious about being in a professional environment and meeting new people. Despite this, I immediately felt welcome, and the positive and vibrant atmosphere within the department got me very excited about the opportunities and activities I would be getting involved with. Of course, I was apprehensive as it was not my original placement or line of work which I would originally chose or was interested to get involved with, yet this was the kick I needed to get me out of my comfort zone.

Luckily, I came at the perfect time. In the height of the organisation of the department’s two biggest job fairs ‘GoGlobal’ and ‘Work while you study’ (which I encourage everyone to come and check out!) I have helped towards the planning and promotion of these. I devised floor plans for the space at which the fairs will take place, deciding how the layout should be and where each company will stand. I’ve chosen the promotional videos for each company who will be at the fair (Apologies in advance if these bore you) and completing admin work, such as coding on the UniHub website, and I have sat in meetings among the careers team which was great to analyse from a Psychology perspective! These are things which I’d have never in a million years seen myself doing- yet, thank goodness I have! As it has provided me with skills which I’d have never have pushed myself to achieve. I am now looking forward to getting more stuck in!

So, what am I trying to say?

My first week of work placement has already provided me with the most important thing of all…confidence; Self-confidence, confidence in my abilities and skills and the confidence that my opinion, as a student, does matter. My view of Sheffield Hallam has changed.

Already, I have learnt that the University, especially within the careers and employability team, want you to succeed and do well and do all they can to help you achieve your life goals. So, don’t shy away and pop in to the department and ask any questions you may have about your future, or apply for an on/off campus job to earn some pocket money and gain invaluable skills, helping you to be more employable! And if you’re unsure about doing a work placement, all I can say is… Do IT, as no experience is ever wasted.

Nine tips if you’re still looking for a sandwich placement

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If you’re still looking for a sandwich placement for your second year, don’t despair. Here are our top tips for securing a placement:

  1. Use the Placement Portal as one option (placements are uploaded throughout the year including summer), but try a range of other approaches – advertised vacancies, speculative applications and networking (to get inside information)
  2. Don’t forget to search on UniHub – the ‘search employers’ section is also useful as you can identify potential employers to contact
  3. Identify the type of work you’d like and the location, identify potential organisations and then approach them directly – discussing strategies with an Employability Adviser can help
  4. Take the time to get a named person to call or address your email to, then make sure you follow up to check they’ve received your email/CV after around two weeks if you don’t hear anything
  5. Utilise social media: create a positive online presence, use twitter and LinkedIn to get ideas about potential organisations, positions and contacts – see if you can arrange to talk to your contacts face-to-face.
  6. Look out for full-time vacancies: contact the employer to explain that you’re available for 12 months and ask whether they would still consider your application
  7. Check websites such as student ladder, Targetjobs, Prospects and Rate My Placement – identify organisations which interest you then identify alternative companies you could approach which are less well known
  8. Make a list of 50 employers you’d consider: use UniHub, try Googling “top 10 transport companies in Yorkshire” (or whatever criteria suits you), ask others for suggestions, check professional bodies’ websites, then ring the employers on your list to ask whether they offer sandwich placements and ask for suggestions for other companies to try
  9. Find a list of previous employers who’ve offered sandwich placements to students from your course in previous years and contact them to ask whether they’ve recruited this year: you may need to ask lecturers or placement administrators to help you locate the list

Students wowing employers amongst other visitors at the Sheffield Hallam Nutrition Fair

by Karen Allan, Careers and Employability Service

The Nutrition Fair organised by Sheffield Business School’s Nutrition course leader Anna Hall is in its 13th year and was held last month at the university. The creativity and knowledge on show from the students this year was outstanding and more than kept up the reputation from previous years. The fair is a regular feature in the calendar of visitors from Totley Primary school and now it is becoming a fixture for employers keen to attract these talented students.

Karen Allan, Employability Adviser at Sheffield Hallam contributes to the list of companies invited to the event. Students who are keen to speak with employers are asked to submit their contact details to Karen beforehand.

She said: “I then supply the companies with a list of potential candidates and their stall number. This resulted in a number of conversations and offers of follow up meetings. Fairs like this are much more interesting for employers who are looking for people with specific knowledge and skills. They get the chance to see students in action, such as advising the public about nutrition issues, explaining health benefits and explaining the ideas behind their product development.”

Leading from the front and an eager attendee on the day was Sheffield Hallam University Vice Chancellor Professor Chris Husbands who commented on how the content of the day had made all attendees reflect on diet and nutrition.

He said: “The Nutrition Fair was great fun – engaging, informative and revealing, whatever your previous knowledge about foods and nutrition. It made me think hard, and it made the pupils from local schools who had been invited think hard about diet and nutrition. It covered so many bases: challenging established wisdom, inventive and imaginative and reaching out to diverse audiences.”

Sheffield Hallam Vice Chancellor, Chris Husbands

Sheffield Hallam Vice Chancellor, Chris Husbands attended the Nutrition Fair

Tom Balchin of Barker Ross Food attended the Nutrition Fair and said: “Myself and my colleague Harley attended the Nutrition Fair 2017 at Sheffield Hallam University recently and left feeling more than impressed. We made our way around each project, enticed by the amazing products they had put together and the thought process behind it.

Tom Balchin

Tom Balchin

“It was clear all students had taken a real insight into current market trends and thought about what consumers want. All students were approachable, enthusiastic and knowledgeable. I learnt things from each project with a vast array of handouts for me to take home (including some great recipe cards!)

“A fantastic selection of students with bright futures ahead, great to meet the next generation of professionals within the industry and we will 100% be back next year!”

Thomas Tucker Ltd. will be holding a graduate recruitment event based on the presentations at the event. Gary Durant, Finance & HR Manager added: “This was a true insight in to the calibre of up and coming talented food professionals and we are looking forward to working with the university and its students later in the year.”

Here are some pictures of the fabulous projects on show

Elise Ollerenshaw advising the public

Elise Ollerenshaw advising the public

Pupils from Totley Primary School, Sheffield

Pupils from Totley Primary School, Sheffield

 

 

 

 

 

 

Esther Smith, Freya Harrop, Hannah Van Hest Callender. "Don't Berry your Head" won the prize for most innovative stall sponsored by food ingredient specialists Ulrick and Short.

Esther Smith, Freya Harrop, Hannah Van Hest Callender. “Don’t Berry your Head” won the prize for most innovative stall sponsored by food ingredient specialists Ulrick and Short.

Kamila Bashir and Shumila Hassan

Kamila Bashir and Shumila Hassan

For more information about the Nutrition Fair, please email: k.allan@shu.ac.uk

Guinevere shares her top tips on gaining a Tier 2 sponsored Graduate role in the UK

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The Careers and Employability service provides students and graduates help with careers advice, CV writing, application forms, mock interviews, assessment centres, psychometric testing, skills workshops as well as in class lectures as part of your course. 

Students are also able to access a dedicated Employability Adviser as well as a Careers Consultant dedicated to their course.

Guinevere Chan (Sze Kei Chan), International graduate in MSc International Business Management and was able to fully utilise these services during her time at Sheffield Hallam University.

We spoke to Guinevere recently where she updated us on how she’s progressing after graduating and her current role at PriceWaterhouseCoopers.

Guinevere Chan (second right) whilst working at the ICE club.

Guinevere Chan (second right) whilst working at the ICE club.

What made you choose to study your courses?

I chose to study a MSc programme in International Business Management at Sheffield Hallam mainly because I developed an interest in different cultures and how these differences have an impact on the interactions between people and businesses. As I was undertaking a Business and Human Resource Management course at the time, I quickly realised that I would be interested to deepen my business knowledge with an international focus.

What were your experiences of each course?

I really enjoyed being part of the course for three main reasons.  First of all, the course is highly practical and we were constantly given the opportunity to apply theories and models to real life business cases, in the form of analysis, reports and presentations.  Secondly, the academic staff always challenged us to think critically from different perspectives. I found that having such a mind-set has been very useful in my current job. Finally, the people who are on the course are from a range of different cultural backgrounds, which I thoroughly enjoyed and I made really good friends who I still keep in touch with today.

How did you adjust to living in Sheffield?

I also completed my undergraduate degree at Sheffield Hallam so I was already familiar with the city when I joined the master’s course. However, it was quite difficult at the beginning when I first came to the UK. The main reasons were the different education systems, cultural difference and not knowing anyone in the city.

In comparison to the Hong Kong education system, the biggest differences I found in the UK was the emphasis on autonomy in learning, critical thinking and practical applications. It seemed to me that the higher level of the qualification, the more these aspects apply to my study. 

So for new students coming from Hong Kong and China, be prepared to:

  • Be a lot more involved in expressing your own opinions in class
  • Challenge other perspectives and be prepared to being challenged
  • Take responsibility for your own learning progress
  • Take part in group work
  • Take initiative (e.g. be a course rep)
  • Take a leadership role (e.g. leader of a group project)
  • Read quality news regularly to keep up to date with what is happening (e.g. BBC News, Financial Times, Guardian)
  • Develop your skill set outside the classroom through engaging with extracurricular activities
Guinevere appeared in marketing material for the university during her time in Sheffield

Guinevere appeared in marketing material for the university during her time in Sheffield with hints and tips for other students.

Did anything help you to adjust to UK life?

Yes, definitely. I adapted to the new city very quickly as I built my circle through taking part in the social activities at Sheffield Hallam. As time progressed, I also started to volunteer to participate in different projects and societies, through which I expanded my social circle and sharpened my skills at the same time. My favourite social activities were the day trips that are organised by the International Experience Team as I was able to travel and see more of the UK and meet new people at the same time.

Did you do any part time work whilst in the UK?

I did. I started off working in the ICE club at the university which is part of the University’s Campus Jobs (paid roles to work for the university) and later I also worked at a retail store called Argos during the summer months.

You have recently gained a Graduate role. Tell us more about this.

Company: Price Waterhouse Coopers. Role title: Associate Management Consultant

My role is part of a two year graduate scheme, in which I will have the opportunity to experience a range of different projects. My responsibilities are varied depending on the projects but a few examples would be conducting market research to identify potential clients and opportunities for  the company; and assisting in designing and implementing sustainable transformation programmes for our clients.

Can you outline some of the support you received during your course from the various parts of the University?

During my four years at Sheffield Hallam, I received a lot of support from different people. The tutors helped to shape my thinking and always challenged me to achieve more than I thought I could be. The Careers Consultants and Employability Advisers helped me to build my CV and helped me to understand the steps that I needed to take to secure a job in the UK. I believe that the understanding of the UK job market is absolutely critical to landing a job as an international student. As for the International Experience Team, they offered an excellent visa advice service which helped me to understand the various types of Visas that I would need to obtain to work in the UK after graduation. Finally, taking part in the ICE club and other volunteering opportunities helped me to develop my communication skills, confidence, English language capability and to expand my network, which was also critical to my path in landing a graduate job in the UK with Tier 2 sponsorship.

What advice do you have for any other international students who are seeking a placement or graduate role in the UK?

To the international students who are looking for a placement or a graduate role in the UK, my advice would be plan ahead, make good use of the services on offer from the Careers and Employability centre, take part in extracurricular activities and gain a good understanding of the UK job market.

Here are some questions I recommend to you to get your thinking started:

  • What roles and in what industry you are interested in and what skills are required for those roles?
  • What kind of experiences or opportunities do you have access to right now that can help you develop those skills? (Such as volunteering, societies, part time work, internships.. etc)
  • What do you know about the job market that you are interested in? (Such as who are the major companies that sponsor work visas in the UK or elsewhere, what are their recruitment processes.. etc)
  • Why do you want to find a job in the UK and are you prepared to go through some of the vigorous recruitment processes involved?

All in all, landing a job in the UK as an international student can be very challenging. However, it is definitely not impossible as long as you are willing to put in great effort for preparations. If there is one thing that I want you to take away from this, it would be: Prepare, prepare and prepare!

Anything else you want to add?

I wish I had known that everything will work out eventually, and that I shouldn’t put too much stress on myself. 

Come to our careers fair on Thursday 23rd March

With our Spring Fair taking place on Thursday 23rd March, this is your chance to meet with dozens of local, national and international employers who are offering graduate recruitment, internship and placement opportunities.

If you want to hear five great reasons why you should attend our careers fair, have a look at the video below:

To book your attendance at the fair, please click here.

If you’re already attending, then here’s some great student tips on how to prepare for the fair!

We look forward to seeing you on Thursday 23rd March between 11am – 3pm in Hallam Hall and the Careers and Employability Centre.

Careers Fairs – the blind date you need to be attending!

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ACES-Events-258-Learning-for-employment

I wonder what the person behind me on this train would say to me if they had 30 seconds to hold my attention? I’ve never met them before but I like to think I’m quite easy to get on with. My ability to remember random information about the most bizarre of topics should mean that i am confident we could at least hold a conversation beyond the simple nod of fellow commuter approval!

It just so happens that this guy is wearing my Football teams colours. The knowing nod turned into a question and answer session based on long suffering Sheffield Football opinions.

Consider this scenario. . .

Say I had booked this train well in advance knowing that the guy was going to be on there along with several others with a similar passion and enthusiasm for the same topic. Throw the team manager and a couple of the players on the first class carriage and all of a sudden we have everything needed in the confines of one train to truly make a difference and impact on what is essentially a profit making business.

ACES-Events-272-Learning-for-employment

Do you work for an enthusiastic retail company and are you looking for enthusiastic team members to make a difference on the shop floor?

Do you work in construction and would your company benefit from being in a room of Building Surveying or Urban Planning students? We’re giving you access to top future talent with up to date and innovative thinking from within your industry. This could prove invaluable and give you that competitive edge in the market.

Are you an Engineer looking for Engineers? It’s the same principle. A recruitment fair is a blind date you can’t afford to miss.

Why, I can hear you thinking?

Number 1 – Its free of charge for you to access highly skilled, specialist students and graduates that will make a difference to the future of your business. The best thing is, they’re all under one roof! We spend so much time on smart phones in today’s society but is there really a better form of communication than face-to-face contact?

Number 2 – Students want to see YOU! The competitive labour market has given our students a desire to forge a career whilst they are still studying. There will be attendees who have the skills and specialisms that you’re looking for.

Number 3 – Brand Awareness! First impressions are everything. Your competitors won’t miss a trick, they will be there too. This is your opportunity to showcase your company and exactly what you are looking for and can offer. By the time our students graduate, they will be looking for opportunities to join companies who they are familiar with.

Number 4 – One size doesn’t necessarily fit all. We make our students aware well in advance that you are coming on campus. This means you have a chance to appeal to non-traditional applicants. What’s interesting to a Bio-Science student might not be what you initially think. Thinking outside the box is often a catalyst for positive change.

Number 5 – Give something back to those who could make a difference in your business. Utilise any alumni connections you have with our University and bring along an ex-Hallam graduate who is working for you. What better way to get your message across than it coming from someone who automatically has things in common with our students?

Get involved in our recruitment and careers fairs starting with the Work While You Study Part-Time Jobs Fairs on Wednesday 5th October . Employ our students in paid part-time roles to fit alongside their studies.

To attend please complete a booking form as an expression of interest, and our team will be in touch to discuss.

Wednesday 5th October 2016 – Work While You Study Fair – City Campus
Thursday 6th October 2016 – Work While You Study Fair – Collegiate Campus
Tuesday 25th October 2016 – Business & Finance – placement and graduate jobs fair
Wednesday 26th October 2016 – STEM – placement and graduate jobs fair
Wednesday 2nd November 2016 – Events, Tourism, Hospitality & Food – placement and graduate jobs fair
Thursday 10th November 2016 – The Natural and Built Environment Careers Fair

So, without further ado . . . Let the jobs, see the students!

Post written by James Beighton, Student Employment Co-ordinator at Sheffield Hallam University. For more of his musings, you can also connect with James on LinkedIn.

The best advice I could give students is to volunteer

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Psychology graduate Dani, shares about her current role as an Assistant Psychologist and highlights the value of gaining experience, both in demonstrating your skills to future employers and also in deciding on a career path.

Dani Mounfield at Graduation

Dani Mounfield at Graduation in 2015

“Since graduating, in 2015, I worked for a few months at a residential facility for adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Learning Disabilities before getting my current role.

I currently work for Chrysalis Associates (www.chrysalisassociates.org), a private company who offer therapy for children with attachment and trauma difficulties. As an Assistant Psychologist I complete assessments of the children, both pre and post therapy, looking into their attachment and trauma symptoms, as well as their behavioural difficulties and receptive vocabulary. Additionally I oversee childcare sessions, which requires me to ensure the children are as calm and regulated as possible; this can range from just one child to multiple at one time.

During University I took the Work Placement Module, where I worked for South Yorkshire Fire Departments Youth Service. I also completed a two day Mental Health First Aid Training course, which I would highly recommend, and training at Doncaster Prison, with the charity Catch 22. However most importantly I volunteered for around two years with my current employer, Chrysalis Associates, where my role was solely data entry. Arguably this volunteering was the most important factor in gaining my current job. Without my previous contact with Chrysalis Associates they wouldn’t have contacted me again to offer me an interview, which ultimately got me the job. Before the interview I read through all the reflection notes I had made whilst volunteering, this consisted of all the tasks I had completed and my thoughts and considerations of my time there. I also went through any notes and lecture slides I had from University that were relevant to the job role; additional to this I researched online, looking at what current literature was revealing about children with attachment and trauma difficulties.

In my job I use lots of skills that I learnt in University every single day, from my confidence and people skills to those more specific to psychology; report writing and data analysis. When thinking about my future I am hoping to get one of the very competitive places on a Clinical Psychology Doctorate. However until I can secure one of these places I am trying to build up my CV, with both paid and volunteer work.

The best advice I could give to current students is to volunteer; these days’ employers want you to not only finish university with a good grade, but also show that you are committed to your career path. Employers want to see that you have made efforts during university to go out into the working world and start to build up your practical skills. However, volunteering is also beneficial for yourself, it helps you to figure out what you’d like to specialise in. For example; throughout my first and second year I was confident that my main focus was forensic psychology, however after volunteering at Chrysalis Associates and having done training in Doncaster Prison, I realised that I was more interested and passionate about a clinical psychology career path.”

My time working for Careers and Employability

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Olivia – our second year Psychology placement student – has written her final post for us.

We’re already half way through March and I can’t believe my placement is nearly over! During the seven weeks that I’ve been here I’ve experienced so much it’s hard to sum it up in this one blog post. I’ve witnessed an entire week of creativity happening around me. I’ve been involved in successful part-time jobs fairs both at City and Collegiate. At the University’s Mental Health and Wellbeing Day I was fortunate enough to meet loads of companies relevant to jobs that I’m interested in. Only last week I was involved in the organisation of celebrating International Women’s Day which couldn’t have gone any better! Listening to inspirational women talk about their success in careers, which are typically male dominated, was extremely interesting and thought-provoking.

olivia

During my time here I have worked on many aspects of social media, ranging from promotion of events on twitter, creating a campus jobs group on LinkedIn, and producing a short video summary of the Creative Careers Week for Facebook. On a similar note, the videoing didn’t just stop there! In a hope to encourage more students to visit City Campus, so as to not miss out on some of the great opportunities, a colleague and I created a short video to demonstrate just how quick and easy the journey from Collegiate is.

Within my time at the Careers and Employability Centre I was able to complete two small projects. One of which was a spreadsheet and information pack on what psychometric tests are, and what psychometric tests are used by different companies. This will hopefully be useful for future students to use as a way of familiarising themselves with what may be expected of them when applying for specific jobs. Another project I worked on throughout my time here involved thinking of ways to gain feedback from students who don’t utilise the Careers and Employability Service. I wanted to know why this was and ways students believe the Careers Service could be improved. I was able to send a questionnaire to a list of students who haven’t used the Careers and Employability Service and gain useful feedback that way.

centreFurthermore, another part of the placement I particularly enjoyed doing was helping with practice interviews and observing student consultations and business advisor meetings. This really allowed me to interact with the students and gain first-hand experience of just some of the day-to-day jobs the Careers Consultants and Advisers do.

Overall, it has been a fantastic experience with so many things happening at all times. I have been privileged enough to work in an amazing team with some truly wonderful people!

 

Hallam helped me gain the confidence to apply for internships…

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Post by Emily Jefferies

I study BA English Language at Sheffield Hallam and as part of second year we all take part in a module named ‘Work-based Project’. This is where we are encouraged to contact various organisations and companies to gain some work experience. At the end of the year, we compile everything we have learnt, from both the successes and the failures, into a folder to present for assessment. I am still currently involved in this module and, although it has not been completely straightforward or without its problems, the key thing I have picked up from it is how to deal with each set back and move forward from it. This has built up my confidence as the idea of things failing doesn’t seem so daunting anymore; I am learning how I can manage complications and overcome obstacles.

internships

This spurred me on to take some initiative and investigate possible opportunities for work experience in summer. I worked on creating a new CV and this is when I realised how important every little bit of experience I had gained over recent years was; every bit of volunteering, employment and writing I had done as it all came together to produce an impressive body of work. I then began researching internships and workshops that I could apply to, and asked around if anyone knew of anything I would be interested in. I cannot emphasise enough how surprisingly useful it is to simply talk to people and enquire about any experiences available that they know of; this is how I discovered both an internship and a workshop that appealed to me. The internship was for ‘Now’ magazine in London and I got in contact with one of their employees and sent in my CV. I then had a phone call in which we discussed further details and I was informed I had got a place on the internship for four weeks in May.

The workshop is with a company called ‘The Writer’; it spans over two days and is targeted to second year undergraduates each year. They offer some experience of writing in a professional environment, and ask that applicants send in a short piece of writing explaining why they want to take part in the workshop and why they should be chosen. I am awaiting their response but, regardless of what they say, I am pleased I tried for it anyway. I often used to not give things a go in fear of being unsuccessful, however since working on Hallam’s work-based project I have learnt that there is no harm in contacting people and sending in applications. If you are reading this and are also a student looking for some experience then I urge you to just do a bit of research, whether it be online or communicating with people, and just give the applications a go. Also, when working on your CV try to make it appeal to the areas in which you wish to work in or apply to. A bit of perseverance and initiative can go a long way, and it will be worth it.