Get ahead. Get International Experience

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By Nikki Abbott, Employability Adviser.

Research has found that students who have spent time abroad studying, working or volunteering during their degree are more likely to be in a higher salary graduate job, are more likely to attain a first or upper class second degree and are less likely to be unemployed.

In addition you will develop many skills sort after by employers and will gain valuable experiences to add to your CVs. By matching opportunities with your motivations and objectives, gaining experience abroad can help give you an edge.

There are a range of international experiences that could be open to you including: internships and exchanges; temporary and seasonal work; teaching English as a foreign language, and volunteering. If you are a first year student you may be able to apply to the Cantor Bursary for up to £500 to help with travel costs, accommodation and living expenses for the duration of the period of work experience.

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Look at international internships, summer work experience and volunteering opportunities offered by companies such as those referred to on Careers Central and advertised on the Careers and Employability Services’ UniHub website.

New opportunities will be added regularly up until the end of term so remember to keep checking the site.

To find out more about the wide range of opportunities open to you, visit Careers Central or speak to an adviser.

Come to our careers fair on Thursday 23rd March

With our Spring Fair taking place on Thursday 23rd March, this is your chance to meet with dozens of local, national and international employers who are offering graduate recruitment, internship and placement opportunities.

If you want to hear five great reasons why you should attend our careers fair, have a look at the video below:

To book your attendance at the fair, please click here.

If you’re already attending, then here’s some great student tips on how to prepare for the fair!

We look forward to seeing you on Thursday 23rd March between 11am – 3pm in Hallam Hall and the Careers and Employability Centre.

How we can help you during National Careers Week

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Helping students to plan out the next steps of their careers is an everyday occurrence here at Sheffield Hallam University.

This week is no exception as we host a series of events to support the 2017 National Careers Week.

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These events include:

To book your space, click the link on each event.

Come along and join us for a week of fun events and meet the Careers and Employability Team

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Careers Welcome Week

Monday 19th September – Freebie Fair (The Hubs 1 – 5pm)

We will be at the Students’ Union Freebie fair, so come and see us to find out what we can do for you, from helping you find a part time job to creating a winning CV! And of course pick up some freebies!

Tuesday 20th September – All the Fun of the ‘Careers’ Fair (Hallam Sq 11am – 2pm

Take part in Fairground stall games, win prizes and enter competitions.

Wednesday 21st September – Careers Market Place (Careers & Employability Centre 11am – 2pm)

Come along to our Careers Market place to meet the people that are here to support you during your time at University and see what the Careers & Employability Service has to offer you from your very first day through to graduation! Have a chat and eat some cake!

Thursday 22nd September – Volunteering Fair (The Hubs 1 – 5pm)

We will also be at the Students’ Union Volunteering fair, so come along and meet us to find out how we can support you in finding and gaining volunteering opportunities both in the UK and abroad.

Friday 23rd September – Collegiate Fresher’s Fair (Heart of the Campus 10am – 3pm)

A combination of our events earlier in the week, games, competitions, prizes, cake………….

So you want to be an artist…..?

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The Moor, SheffieldAs part of Departure Point Yorkshire, a creative venture to support emerging theatre companies the Moor Theatre Delicatessen is currently offering a series of free public workshops for early career artists (and those wanting to work in the arts industry). As the new Employability Adviser for Humanities (including Stage & Screen), the opening session was unmissable.

Led by Jess Brewster, Co- Artistic Director of Theatre Delicatessen, this engaging discussion was about what it means to be an artist and how you might become one. The panel of four speakers includedSheffield Hallam University graduate Sarah-Jane Parker, a visual artist and founder of Muriel Design; Terry O’Connor, a creative member of Forced Entertainment and Professor of Contemporary Theatre and Performance Practice at the University of Sheffield; Nina Segal, a playwright/producer and Malaika (‘Max’) Cunningham, Artistic Director of local theatre company, The Bare Project.

Like the panel members, this event did not lend itself to being pigeonholed! Not only did it tackle issues that artists grapple with, but it also offered insight that could also be applicable outside of the arts industry, particularly if you are interested in freelance work and/or a ‘portfolio career’. A number of themes and useful tips came out:

Don’t be afraid of a fluid career and practise articulating the value of what you do

The pressure to focus on a particular role to be remembered and taken seriously was acknowledged, but the most important thing is to have an inner conviction that you are an artist. One tip was to focus on a form of work rather than an individual role; something which Nina, as both a writer and producer, has embraced.

As many people are unfamiliar with non-play based theatre, Terry finds explaining what Forced Entertainment does a challenge, but suggested that perseverance can pay off!

Departure Points

Avoid direct comparison with others

It was recognised that it can be a struggle not to compare yourself to others, particularly those who secure certain high status venues and reviews etc. ‘Look for value in your own work rather than competing with others’ and ‘resist following trends for the sake of it; stick to what you want to do,’ advised Max.

Persevere to strike the balance between financial survival and your artistic development

Working outside of the industry is common, particularly in early careers, but aim to choose roles that leave you the energy to continue developing your art. Sarah spoke of her long term determination to become financially independent rather than relying on external funding. She has gradually built up a wallpaper design business (supported by our very own enterprise team). ‘This allows more time for my individual art work than previous jobs have done,’ Sarah added. As it is a creative business, it feels part of her artistic life consisting of ‘interconnected strands’, which can be individual or collaborative; commercially focused or not.Departure Points 2

Be aware of the realities of the market but maintain a positive perspective

To some extent, both the panel and audience acknowledged that trends and marketing can sometimes lead to being pigeonholed by funders and venues. However, there is a flipside to this coin, as branding can also be useful to sustain a career. There is no easy answer, but the consensus was to compartmentalize different aspects of the industry; ‘get perspective – distance yourself from the parts of the industry you don’t like and focus on those that you love!’ advised Max.

There are three more public Departure Point workshops; see full details here – https://goo.gl/AXfWpN 

Post written by Laura Kerley, Employability Adviser for Humanities (including Stage & Screen) at Sheffield Hallam University.

Lawyer in London 2016

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Post written by Helen Cuthbert, Helena Kennedy Law Clinic at SHU

This year’s Lawyer in London trip, which took place from 21-23 June, was a resounding success. During the trip the students, supported by SHU staff, visited the Royal Courts of Justice, Amnesty International and Freshfields.

Each of the days highlighted different aspects of the legal profession, from highflying magic circle lawyers to human rights based charities, showing the diverse range of careers available to Law graduates.

Some of the additional experiences which were not expected included joining with hundreds of people in Trafalgar Square for the Jo Cox MP memorial and seeing the Princess Royal at Amnesty.

Some of the students who attended Lawyer in London have summed up their experiences and highlight the great time that they had.

Lucy says:

‘Lawyer in London was an amazing experience. Throughout the trip I gained many skills that will help me in the future with my career.

Lawyer in London Group Photo

Lawyer in London Group Photo

Spending time at Freshfields was my favourite. Speaking to lawyers and also trainee Lawyers helped to gain an insight into how a magic circle law firm works.

Overall it was an incredible experience and I would encourage everyone to apply next year as it has made me even more determined to be successful.’

 Taylor says:

“The experience overall was interesting, a fantastic learning opportunity and most of all fun.

Selfie at Lawyer in London 2016

Selfie at Lawyer in London 2016

Getting to go to the Royal Courts of Justice, Amnesty International and Freshfields not only provided useful career information but genuinely made me interested in areas of law that I never took interest in before!

From my experience this was a great opportunity which gave useful tips and information for going forward into a career in law. Thanks for a great trip!”

#NWED2016 – National Women in Engineering Day

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Post by Level 4 Sport Technology Student student, Arona Morrison.

I chose my course, BSc Sport Technology because it combined all the subjects from school that I love and excel at, some more than others. I excelled at both design and P.E. at A-level and combined they lead me to the sports line of engineering, however my passion for science and maths was what truly pushed me to become an engineering.

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I say passion because I had to work hard at both as I often struggled in maths. I have always had a need to want to know how things work and operate and this course allows me to figure this out from looking at the materials equipment is made from to the forces acting upon each separate piece. My course specifically also looks at human anatomy and how equipment interacts with the human body, which I really enjoy.
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I hope by completing this course that in the future I will be able to get a job designing equipment specific to climbing as this another of my passions and being able to combine the two would be a dream job.

“I don’t think I would reach as high in the jobs I am looking for, if it wasn’t for all the additional help from SHU”

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Natalia (right) networking with recruiters from Enterprise Rent-a-Car at the recent Careers and Employability Awards evening.

Natalia (right) networking with recruiters from Enterprise Rent-a-Car at the recent Careers and Employability Awards evening.

Post by Level 5 Digital Media Production student, Natalia M Wesniuk.

I am a mature, Level 5 Digital Media Production student and I have been out to the ‘real world’ only to come back to the University and finish my degree. It’s a challenging world out there and the problem is that you can be qualified for the job but if you don’t know how to cope with complicated and demanding recruitment process, you may just fall short of getting your dream position.

On top of computerised, test based, long and tiered process, there is always a stress and fear factor. It’s not easy for us students out there; it’s not easy for anyone. Luckily Sheffield Hallam University offer a special preparation for its students interested in applying to large graduate recruitment schemes called ‘Career Impact’, in which Level 5 and 6 students can gain the inside full knowledge into the process of getting their dream jobs and becoming ‘graduates with more’.

For me personally, I feel like the workshops boosted my confidence and enhanced my employability skills. I had a chance to speak to the employers and realise that they actually do want us to succeed and get the job, but we just need to follow their procedures to do so. I learned a lot about graduation recruitment practices, as well as making my CV and applications stand out. Receiving guided support, helped me get my own CV up to scratch before all the careers fairs in March. I was taught about leadership development and applying for management roles. I also attended a workshop about effective networking, which enabled me to learn how to use social media into my advantage and how to extend my network in a professional manner. Most importantly I was able to face so called Psychometric Tests. Career Impact advisers gave all of us plenty of links, where we could practice and prepare before the real test itself.

I feel like I can effectively face the whole recruitment process now and a bit more practice after this boot camp could get me far. I still have the other half of the course to undergo and I am confident that with support through Career Impact I will secure a place on a Graduation Recruitment Scheme and I really do I hope I will get my dream job in the end. I would not have that much of a prospective view if not the extra help from Careers and Employability staff and their reassuring support. I really don’t think I would reach out as high in the jobs I am looking for if it wasn’t for the employability fairs and workshops and all the additional help that SHU has for its students.

Frankly knowledge is power but knowing where to apply it, in order to benefit from it and how to get where we want to be, is certainly a whole new chapter. I really do recommend all students to check their emails frequently and to sign up to additional workshops such as Career Impact as it can work a long way and make things easier.

Career Impact will open to new applicants in the autumn term, current students can find out more about Career Impact here: https://careerscentral.shu.ac.uk/getting-experience/career-impact

TravelBird Scholarship

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Travelbird Scholarship

Travelbird have an exciting opportunity for one student to win a €3,000 scholarship prize to go towards their travel experiences, work placement or studies, based on a creative project. The most successful applicant will also have the chance complete an internship at their Headquarters in Amsterdam for 3 to 6 months, and students are now eligible to enter.

What’s the Opportunity?

  • The TravelBird Scholarship will enable a talented and motivated student to work at their Amsterdam office for a period of 3 to 6 months based on the winning project about a travel experience.
  • The benefits don’t stop at the invaluable insights you’ll gain during your time there, or even the €3,000 prize you’ll receive for having been awarded the scholarship. You can also look forward to delicious, healthy lunches, free wine and beer at the end of a great week and the use of your own Macbook Pro.
  • In addition to this, you will also receive an intern allowance of €350 per month. Sound good? Then they want to hear from you!

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How to Apply?

To apply for this scholarship you need to be a current student and answer the following question:

“What has been your most inspirational travel experience?”

  • There are no limits as to how you can approach the question, we would actively encourage you to think carefully about and approach the question from as wide, creative or inspiring a perspective as possible! You are also free to choose which format you want to answer the question with, please go to the Travelbird website for more details and how to apply.
  • The application deadline is at 23:59 (CET) on May 31st, 2016, and the winner will be announced on June 15th. The internship will last for 3 to 6 months and you can choose when you want to start, as long as are you are still a university student aged 18 and over (ie, have not yet graduated) at the point at which you begin.
  • This is open to all national and international students, however only entries in the following languages will be accepted: English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Danish, Finnish and Norwegian.

SHU PATHWAYS 2016

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Natalia M Wesniuk 1Post by Level 5 Digital Media Production student, Natalia M Wesniuk.

One of my most recent assignments at Sheffield Hallam University was for the module called Managing Creative Processes. All the students from my course were delegated to manage and organize The Creative Media Networking Event at Sheffield Hallam University, called Pathways 2016.

Natalia M Wesniuk 2My responsibility was: Project Management of a Marketing Team and VIP Management on the day of the event. Apart from designing the marketing campaign and managing a group of 4 in order to appropriately deliver the social media campaign, I was also responsible to meet and greet our guests and speakers on the day. I also needed to make sure they were at their workshop on time and help them with anything they needed to set up their presentations.

It was a very hard working month before the event and even more hectic on the day but hell yeah it was so exciting! As a student behind the scenes of the event I really enjoyed the buzz around managing a creative process like this. I met a lot of important people from film, TV, radio and photography and this has motivated me in setting up my future goals and to figure out what I actually want to do when I finish University. It has been a great learning experience, as much as it has been fun to be part of a live project for a change. Being in charge of things and people is not for everyone but, when you do get a chance to try it and you do it right, the gratification is astonishing and gives a great injection of self-belief.
SHU gives us access to some brilliant projects and I am so grateful to be a part of this University. I intend to make the most out of each opportunity it gives me, as quite frankly you only get one shot in life so make it count I say!

Natalia M Wesniuk 3Being able to speak in person to the media industry guests has given me the inspiration to keep going and push myself that one more step to stay ahead; and be able to get a dream job at the end of my university degree.

Especially after listening to Fiona Hanlon from BBC Radio 1 and Marie Clare from BBC Radio 5 Live, both SHU alumni and once were just like me – a student and didn’t really know what to do with themselves, but worked hard and things just happened.

I think what students underestimate the most is the power of doing those extra curricular efforts like attending speeches from experienced people and seeking advice. Everyone loves being an expert in something but every expert was a student one day and they are all there to help you. All you need to do is be passionate about your interests, seek answers and dig deeper. Sooner or later you will become anyone you want. I got the impression that every workshop at SHU Pathways 2016 was trying to tell us this simple truth.