Why a career in PR content is the right role for writers

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Post by Holly Ashford, Senior Content Writer at Babel

If you’re a student or graduate on one of Hallam’s dedicated PR courses, you’ll likely know more than I did when I first started looking into PR as a career path. An English Literature graduate and later a journalist (via a few freelance copywriting roles), I moved from a business-to-business technology publication to a technology PR agency two years ago this September.

As a former journalist and editor, I moved to ‘the dark side’ last year, and as Babel’s Senior Content Writer I’m responsible for the words that change hearts and minds. A lover of the outdoors, when I’m not cycling London’s streets I can be found running Regents Park’s paths.

I joined Babel – an international tech PR agency headquartered – in London, as a Senior Content Writer, attracted by the prospect of writing for a diverse set of clients and publications and gaining knowledge of new industry sectors. So, what does a role like Senior Content Writer involve?  What are the skills required? And how can you go about securing a career in content?

Content: the cornerstone of PR?

Content director, content marketer, integrated content strategy, content creation, content publication, content is king, optimising content, SEO content…‘content’ is an essential component of the PR/marketing argot, though remains a somewhat vague term to anyone on the outside, including many who are interested in a career in PR.

In an era where almost anyone can produce and publish text, image, audio and video, many PR agencies need someone who can do so creatively and can craft engaging and relevant content which cuts through the noise.

A day in the life

Every PR agency will be different, but at Babel there is a particular emphasis on written content, meaning anything we produce (either for clients or our own brand) involves in-depth briefing, research, creation, proofing and editing. I help to manage these processes, work with other members of the team to develop their creative ideas and writing style, and come up with new content ideas for clients. Yet a great deal of my day is spent writing and learning – which, for someone who has always wanted to be ‘a writer’ of some description, is ideal.

One of the most enjoyable aspects of my role is being able to write different kinds of content for different audiences. On a given day in the office I might be working on a very technical press release for one client, whilst ghost-writing a feature destined for a trade publication for another, and transcribing material for a research-led whitepaper for a third. Creating less formal, high-level material offers a counterbalance: I might be writing a blog post for a client’s website, while overseeing output for the corporate social media account of a second.

My day is punctuated by reviewing the written work of members of the Babel team and (on occasion) clients. As well as offering an all-important second pair of eyes, this helps to ensure that the copy is as compelling as possible, always meets the client’s objectives, and promotes their core messages.

There’s a nature of unpredictability in PR, given that a great deal of what we do is governed by the daily news agenda. As Senior Content Writer my office hours will, therefore, be spent with fingers to the keyboard and an ear to the ground, keeping an eye out for breaking news stories which are relevant to any of Babel’s clients. When this occurs, I’ll immediately pen a comment in response, which the rest of the team will then pitch to the media.

Career PRospects?

PR and marketing courses offer a strong foundation for a career in PR, but this needn’t be the only route – especially if you’re looking for a content-based role. Many PR agencies looking for candidates will be open to grads from a range of disciplines – it’s more about the skills and attitude you have, and how you’ll fit in with an agency’s culture.

Strong writing skills are obviously a must, but you should be prepared to learn and adapt your writing style too, including being able to take critique (and, yes, criticism) from colleagues and clients. As a former journalist this took some getting used to, but looking back, this approach has helped to hone my writing – and ensure that clients are kept happy and the agency remains successful.

An interest in current affairs is important, and corporate acumen and marketing know-how are a plus. A willingness to learn about the trends and drivers in new – often niche – markets is essential (who knew I’d be an expert in cellular coverage solutions, next-generation networks, and TMT M&A?) and, perhaps most importantly, these skills and strengths must be supported and fuelled by creativity and a love of writing.

Babel is always on the lookout for new talent. Visit our careers page for more information, or email recruitment@babelpr.com

9 Tips for Job Interviews

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Post by Laura Burden, final year student at Hallam

So if, like me, you’re coming to the end of your time studying at Sheffield Hallam, you’re probably starting to think about getting one of those job things. I’ve had a few job interviews recently; I wanted to share some of my experiences and tips.

Let’s assume, for the purpose of this post, that you’ve secured an interview. Pat yourself on the back because that in itself isn’t easy. Clearly, there’s something in your application that they like!

So here’s a bit of a roundup of what I do before, during and after a job interview.

Research the company/organisation

No matter what I know about an organisation, I do a sweep of all the interview and job description information I’ve had and make notes. Then a quick Google search and a poke around their website provides some more general information about the company.

It’s all useful to know and trust me; it’s really obvious when you’ve done your research.

Know where you’re going and who you’re meeting

If I’m not sure where I’m going I do as much research as possible about the place I’ll be going to for my interview – is there parking available, what time will the train arrive there, what if the train’s late?

I’ve arrived more than an hour early for an interview before because I was nervous about being late, thankfully there was somewhere nearby where I could have a coffee. Try to arrive no more than 15 minutes early.

Have you got everything?

Typically you’ll need to bring some ID with you such as a passport. You might also need proof of any qualifications you mentioned on your application so, don’t forget your certificates. I also like to have some water with me (although it’s usually provided in interviews) and some pens and paper. Make sure to check the interview information and see whether you need to do any prep, in the past I’ve had to prepare a presentation and take it with me.

What type of interview is it?

I’ve been to group interviews, presentation interviews, panel interviews and one-to-one interviews; it just depends on the organisation, department and specific role you’re applying for. Each interview type has its pros and cons, usually I find it less nerve-wracking if there’s more than one person interviewing but really it depends on the people! It’s always important to know what type of interview you’re going to, and try to find out the name/s of the interviewers.

First impressions are vital

I know it’s a cliché but it’s true.

Dress smartly (yes, you have to iron your shirt), smile, introduce yourself, shake hands with your interviewers, please and thank you etc. Don’t sit down until a seat is offered, sit up straight, listen to your interviewers carefully and ask for clarification if you’re unsure about something.

Make eye contact and nod or respond where appropriate. Address the person who has asked you the question but also make eye contact with the other members of the panel.

The questions

Top tip – have a look at the job specification; you can usually work out what kind of questions you’ll get. I’ve had questions on personal strengths and weaknesses, working through a difficult situation, why I would be suitable for the role, and everything in between.

I definitely recommend having a couple of examples of situations you’ve been in and do some personal reflection.

If you’re struggling to think of the best example to use or how to answer a question, ask if you can come back to it. I’ve done this a few times – they aren’t judging you for it.

STAR

The most important thing to remember for interviews – use the STAR technique.

I’m really bad for waffling and trying to cram in a lot of information – have you noticed? The STAR technique helps me give focused, concise answers.

Situation – Who, what, when, where and why

Task – What was the challenge or problem, what was the end goal?

Action – What did YOU do?

Result – What was the outcome?

Ask your own questions

Always ask at least one question yourself. It shows you’re interested – in the job, the company, the people sat in front of you. Rather than trying to think something up on the spot, I tend to go with a few questions in mind, and then whatever isn’t answered; you’ve got some questions to hand.

Just make sure you don’t ask anything that’s already been answered.

After the interview

Before you leave, make sure they have your contact details and that you know when they will contact you. When they do get in touch, I make sure to thank them for their time and for contacting me, I also always ask for feedback on my interview – even if I’m offered the position.

If you need to take a day to consider a job offer, don’t be afraid to ask for some time. Remember, even though a job offer over the phone is brilliant, it’s not binding, and it’s important to ensure you get some kind of written offer.

Good luck out there and remember to check out the Careers Central Interviews page for more advice, tips and to book a mock interview if you’re feeling unprepared or unsure!

Top Tips for improving your performance with psychometric assessments

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If you find the idea of completing online psychometric assessments daunting you’re not alone. Saqib Saddiq, Senior Psychologist at Graduates First shares his top tips for tackling psychometric tests:

  1. Start thinking about psychometric assessments well in advance so you have time to research the types of assessments you might be asked to complete and familiarise yourself with them. Many employers use the same test publishers to source their psychometric tests, so it’s worth spending time practicing to familiarise yourself with the types of psychometric tests and typical formats before you sit the assessments for real.
  2. Spend time practicing tests in advance. Most universities purchase packages to enable their students and graduates to practice online assessments under similar conditions to the real thing and receive detailed feedback so they can identify and work on areas for improvement. Along with Graduates First, (subscribed to by Sheffield Hallam University and other universities), other sites offering practice tests include CEBGlobal and Assessment Day.
  3. Find out which types of tests you’re likely to face with specific employers (for example look at the employer profiles on Graduates First), then spend time preparing for those specific tests. If you know you’ll be sitting a numerical reasoning test (tests your ability to reason with numerical information using basic arithmetic calculations) practice basic calculations in advance e.g. via BBC Bitesize. If you are expecting to take a situational judgement test or work personality questionnaires research the type of candidate the company is looking for and try to match your characteristics. When answering questions in the real assessment try to think of behaviours that a good candidate would demonstrate.
  4. Use practice tests to identify areas you can improve on, then work on improving your performance in those areas. If you find you struggle with accuracy, work on your concentration. If you run out of time you might need to take more practice tests and work on your speed.
  5. Realise that you’re not expected to finish the assessments –  they’re designed to stretch all candidates (meaning that no-one will reach the end). Stay calm and do your best – without getting upset if you do not manage to answer all questions. This is especially important if you are expected to go through a number of assessments in a row.
  6. Make sure you have the right conditions to maximise your performance completing the assessments use a PC or laptop in a quiet location where you won’t be disturbed etc. Make sure you have all the necessary items to hand before your start, such as a few sheets of paper, a pen and a calculator (if needed).

For more tips from myself and my colleagues at Graduates First, follow us on YouTube

 

Making it in digital marketing without a marketing degree

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Hear top tips from Creative Writing graduate, Hannah Tomaszewski about how she got into Digital Marketing, took a risk and followed her heart to career satisfaction!

Hannah TomaszewskiHow I managed to land my dream job in digital marketing with no relevant degree and very little experience!

I graduated from Sheffield Hallam University in the summer of 2016 with a 2:1 Degree in Creative Writing and not much clue as to what I wanted to do next. I knew I wanted to write but couldn’t seem to figure out what route to go down. When I eventually researched marketing jobs and realised it sounded perfect for me, there was one problem – I didn’t have a marketing degree. In a world where most graduate jobs seem to require at least 2 years’ experience, it seemed impossible. Here’s how I beat the odds and managed to bag a job I’d only ever dreamed of.

What do you do and how did you end up there?

I work as a Digital Marketing Strategist for Bigfoot Digital, an award winning SEO Barnsley Agency. Worried about my lack of experience, after graduating and moving to Chesterfield, I pestered a local marketing agency to let me learn from them in exchange for witty jokes and sarcastic comments. I ended up doing some work experience with them for a month trying to soak up as much knowledge as I could. When I left, I was certain Marketing was the career for me but decided to take a break and worked in a castle hotel in Northumberland for a year – a hilariously odd yet fun experience.

I ended up back in Chesterfield and working in a marketing job that wasn’t what I thought it would be. The job was much more analysis based than advertised and I’m not ashamed to admit I was bored, uninspired and felt like I was sinking. I lasted 4 months until I took a risk, handed in my notice and left with no job lined up. I was told I was being naïve, that any job was better than none, but I followed my gut and, as I walked out on my final day, knew I’d made the right decision. I fired off what felt like millions of applications and, two weeks later, started at Bigfoot. The rest, as they say, is history!

What does an average day at work look like for you?

The thing I love most about my job is that no two days are the same. Although I mainly write content and blog posts for the website, it’s interesting to learn about the more technical aspects of digital marketing and how everyone’s roles interlink and fit together. Our office at Bigfoot is super relaxed and there’s often a background of Spice Girls to get you through the day. My colleagues all have different degrees and experience but we all share a common talent for all things marketing related and help each other out no matter what. I’m so lucky that I get to work with a load of like-minded people who genuinely get on, love their jobs and, most importantly, have a laugh!

My top tips:

  1. Don’t compare yourself to others:

It’s human nature to pit yourself against your peers, especially in a creative industry where everything is so subjective. In my office, everyone’s writing approach and styles are so different that it’s completely pointless to try and compare techniques and, often, while you’re busy being jealous of their talent, they’re thinking the same about yours.

  1. Think about what makes you different:

While I was at university, everyone was writing about serious topics while I dedicated my time to writing chick-lit, simply because I enjoyed it more! At the time, I worried that people would perceive me in a certain way, however I’ve since learnt that you should always play to your strengths. I’m proud to be individual and wrote my cover letter for my current job in my own humorous and informal voice – this is what made my boss hire me as I stood out from everyone else!

  1. Try not to panic and don’t give up.

I often still remind myself of this! The world of graduate jobs is extremely daunting! Always remember that you’re still young and no employer should expect you to know everything. When I left my previous job, I felt entirely lost and hopeless, but just weeks later I felt like a completely different person. There are great companies are out there – you’ve just got to find one!

  1. Be brave and have confidence in your own abilities:

In my first Graduate role, I shied away from speaking up and found it embarrassing to admit if I didn’t understand a task. In my team at Bigfoot, our mantra is ‘there are no stupid questions’ and it’s along these lines that I now try to live my life. Don’t be ashamed to admit if you don’t yet know something, everyone starts somewhere!

If you’re looking for marketing work experience, we’re always looking for talented individuals to join our ever-growing team so get in contact with us today!

 

Everything you need to know before the Hallam Careers Fair

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Post by Sam Burton, BA Journalism student

Sam Burton

Employers from across the nation will be coming to Sheffield Hallam University next week for its first Careers Fair of the academic year.

A great opportunity to meet some leading employers and have a clearer view of what happens after university. To help you prepare Gradtime has all the details, expert tips, and trade secrets you need.

The fair will be at 11am – 3pm on Thursday 26th October. Almost 150 employers will fill several locations across the city campus including: The Careers & Employability Centre, Hallam Hall, Hallam Central, Heartspace, Cantor Building, and Hertha Ayrton Building.

“This will be an amazing chance to find out about a wide range of opportunities,” says Maggie Bamford – employability adviser for Photography, PR, Media and Journalism students. “They will be here to talk about graduate vacancies, placements and internships. You can find out about things you may already be interested in and also opportunities that you didn’t know existed.”

“There will be some recent graduates who were in the same position as you not so long ago, who are now working and can tell you about why they chose those companies and give advice about how to search for jobs and make successful applications.”

On the list of companies to impress at the fair is Asda, Royal Air Force, Citrix, IBM, Royal Mail, and many more organisations from across many industries.

For a full list of the companies attending, as well as directions to the fair click here.

“Build your confidence by speaking to employers who interest you less initially, and then approach your favourites”

According to Prospects.ac.uk, employers are most looking for leadership skills, good communication, planning and research skills, resilience, self-management, team working skills, and work experience.

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“A positive attitude, being polite and a friendly manner, all this and knowing something about the organisation is a huge advantage,” Bamford adds, “employers are interested in students, they are giving up their time and it costs them money to come here, so try to have something interesting to say to them.”

Before coming to the fair, Kent Roach, a careers and employability consultant at Hallam University, said students should “update their CVs and cover letters and prepare their elevator pitch. Just a 30-60 seconds speech on you, your key selling points and the role/sector you are interested in.”

And on the actual day “Present yourself well, dress comfortably but smart and professional. A smile, good eye contact and a hand shake is all you need to introduce yourself to an employer. A good starter is your name, year and subject. Tell them why you might want to work for them. Be ready with your elevator pitch”

If you don’t feel confident about approaching employers “build your confidence by speaking to employers who interest you less initially, and then approach your favourites,” said Bamford, “or attend preparatory events such as ‘I want to be more confident to talk to employers at the careers fairs’.”

You can search for workshops by clicking here.

Careers Fairs – the blind date you need to be attending!

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I wonder what the person behind me on this train would say to me if they had 30 seconds to hold my attention? I’ve never met them before but I like to think I’m quite easy to get on with. My ability to remember random information about the most bizarre of topics should mean that i am confident we could at least hold a conversation beyond the simple nod of fellow commuter approval!

It just so happens that this guy is wearing my Football teams colours. The knowing nod turned into a question and answer session based on long suffering Sheffield Football opinions.

Consider this scenario. . .

Say I had booked this train well in advance knowing that the guy was going to be on there along with several others with a similar passion and enthusiasm for the same topic. Throw the team manager and a couple of the players on the first class carriage and all of a sudden we have everything needed in the confines of one train to truly make a difference and impact on what is essentially a profit making business.

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Do you work for an enthusiastic retail company and are you looking for enthusiastic team members to make a difference on the shop floor?

Do you work in construction and would your company benefit from being in a room of Building Surveying or Urban Planning students? We’re giving you access to top future talent with up to date and innovative thinking from within your industry. This could prove invaluable and give you that competitive edge in the market.

Are you an Engineer looking for Engineers? It’s the same principle. A recruitment fair is a blind date you can’t afford to miss.

Why, I can hear you thinking?

Number 1 – Its free of charge for you to access highly skilled, specialist students and graduates that will make a difference to the future of your business. The best thing is, they’re all under one roof! We spend so much time on smart phones in today’s society but is there really a better form of communication than face-to-face contact?

Number 2 – Students want to see YOU! The competitive labour market has given our students a desire to forge a career whilst they are still studying. There will be attendees who have the skills and specialisms that you’re looking for.

Number 3 – Brand Awareness! First impressions are everything. Your competitors won’t miss a trick, they will be there too. This is your opportunity to showcase your company and exactly what you are looking for and can offer. By the time our students graduate, they will be looking for opportunities to join companies who they are familiar with.

Number 4 – One size doesn’t necessarily fit all. We make our students aware well in advance that you are coming on campus. This means you have a chance to appeal to non-traditional applicants. What’s interesting to a Bio-Science student might not be what you initially think. Thinking outside the box is often a catalyst for positive change.

Number 5 – Give something back to those who could make a difference in your business. Utilise any alumni connections you have with our University and bring along an ex-Hallam graduate who is working for you. What better way to get your message across than it coming from someone who automatically has things in common with our students?

Get involved in our recruitment and careers fairs starting with the Work While You Study Part-Time Jobs Fairs on Wednesday 5th October . Employ our students in paid part-time roles to fit alongside their studies.

To attend please complete a booking form as an expression of interest, and our team will be in touch to discuss.

Wednesday 5th October 2016 – Work While You Study Fair – City Campus
Thursday 6th October 2016 – Work While You Study Fair – Collegiate Campus
Tuesday 25th October 2016 – Business & Finance – placement and graduate jobs fair
Wednesday 26th October 2016 – STEM – placement and graduate jobs fair
Wednesday 2nd November 2016 – Events, Tourism, Hospitality & Food – placement and graduate jobs fair
Thursday 10th November 2016 – The Natural and Built Environment Careers Fair

So, without further ado . . . Let the jobs, see the students!

Post written by James Beighton, Student Employment Co-ordinator at Sheffield Hallam University. For more of his musings, you can also connect with James on LinkedIn.

Insight into life as a Professional Headhunter

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In our first guest post by an employer, Martin Wigfield from Professional Headhunting firm Sagar Wright talks about why he loves his job.

Sagar

What do I do for a day job? The best comparison is to that of a Football (or Movie) Agent, who finds the best talent, and introduces them to the best clubs, I represent some of the best clients in the Financial Services Industry (such as Aon & Deloitte) and am tasked with scouring the market for the best talent available.  For me, there isn’t a better feeling than delivering on a tricky client assignment.  Knowing you’re working with top industry professionals to help drive a business forward and in return increasing your own personal earnings is very satisfying.

The support in the Graduate Training Academy at Sagar Wright has been second to none. The first 6 weeks is all classroom based training with a really fun mix of role plays, interactive sessions and presentations (very unique in recruitment – some of my friends were only given 2 weeks training, or some none at all!).  Over the next 11 months of the training programme, David Gawthorpe (Graduate Training Academy Director) and Mark Bailey (Training Manager) showed me the ropes and gave me a phenomenal amount of ongoing mentoring and support.  I have weekly development meetings with my managers to discuss my progress, where they give me constructive advice on how I can improve.

The office culture at Sagar Wright is one of the best things about the firm: we are a genuinely close group of friends who are all likeminded and committed to being successful.  Our job can be stressful at times (it’s high level sales, but sales nonetheless!) and to break this up we make sure we rightly celebrate our successes.  We have regular social events and there is always someone to go for a drink with on a Friday.  The social side is great and includes annual all expenses paid trips to The Races, a Christmas Party at one of Leeds’ top restaurants and quarterly events which have included Private Cinema Screenings, Pool & Ping Pong tournaments, meals out and many others.

My favourite thing about this job is that I get out exactly what I put in.  The last 12 months have been great for me, I have worked my socks off and as a result I’ve regularly won the incentives competition, which has paid for new suits, weekends away in top hotels and meals out in Leeds’ leading restaurants.  The commission I’ve earned on my placements has paid for a 2 week trip across the Southern States of America – which is not a bad start for a 24 year old lad from Yorkshire who had no intention of spending £6.00 a pint in London!

I’ve now completed my training year and have been promoted to Consultant.  I’m currently one of the top performers in the team and last week the MD, Steve Wright, told me that I was on my way to achieving Fast Track Promotion.  This scheme was designed by the MD and allows top performers in the business to be promoted twice in 1 year!  Sagar Wright are hiring 15 graduates a year for the next 3 years’ so there’s lots of opportunity to grow and progress in the firm which I find really exciting!

Over the next 12 months’ I’m going to keep building my business to increase my earnings (I’m on track to earn £52k this year), and my goal for the year is to buy a house.  Sagar Wright will allow me to continue my great lifestyle in Leeds and enjoy some great holidays along the way. All of these are realistic goals at Sagar Wright and can be (and have been) achieved in your second year if you do well.  After that I can begin to build and manage my own team, becoming a Manager in the business and recruiting my own Graduate Trainees.  As I’ve always wanted to be a Manager and run my own team, reaching this milestone will give me a huge sense of pride and satisfaction.  I can’t wait!

 

For more information on the Graduate Training Academy and for details of how to apply, go to www.professionalheadhunter.co.uk.

 

Advice from Graduate Employers…

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On 3 February, Jenny Cole, Graduate Employment Co-ordinator, and Sheryl Cruickshank, Employment Adviser, attended the AGR Student Recruitment Trade Show in London (AGR is the Association of Graduate Recruiters).  This event brought together employers, recruiters and universities from around the country and provided a great opportunity for SHU to showcase our talented students and graduates.  We exhibited alongside ten other Modern Universities of the North, and spoke to many employers about the skills, talent and experience SHU candidates can bring to their businesses.

AGR stand

Key messages from graduate recruiters

Alongside showcasing SHU talent, we spent time networking with graduate recruiters. This is what they said about the graduate labour market:

  • graduate vacancies are up 11.9% this year
  • there are around 70 applicants per vacancy
  • top 5 growth areas are IT/Telecoms, Public, Construction, Engineering/Industry and Investment Banking

We also spoke to employers to find out what they are really looking for in applicants during the application process.  This is what they said:

We need a balance of knowledge and employability skills”

“Students need to demonstrate drive and resilience”

“Show energy and enthusiasm in interviews”

“Awareness of the scope of roles within the sector”

“Extra-curricular activities bring breadth to applications and provide more interesting examples at interview.”

“If you get to assessment centre, rest well and be yourself.”

Overall students navigating the graduate recruitment process should do lots of research and be prepared.  The Careers and Employment service is here to help you throughout the application process, so make the most of it! Follow this link to find out what the service offers: http://careerscentral.shu.ac.uk/see-adviser/types-appointment

 

I learnt so much in one day!

Sherelle Corbridge, a second year Law student, recently attended an Experience Day at Magic Circle law firm, Clifford Chance.  This is her account of the day:

I am truly grateful and honoured to have been part of Clifford Chance for the day. I had the most incredible day, and it was definitely one of the best experiences I have had. The skills and experience I have come away with are invaluable!

The day started at 9.30am with a Graduate Recruitment Session; this involved a workshop exploring the competencies of Clifford Chance and how we could demonstrate each competency through experiences we already have. This session also introduced us to the application process, assessment days, and interview stages. It was very informative and thorough!

Next, was the Litigation Case Study workshop.  We were split into groups acting as commercial litigation lawyers and negotiating on behalf of our simulated client.

We then proceeded on to the Office Tours, the building is absolutely breath-taking and the facilities Clifford Chance have to offer are exceptional. Later, we had the great opportunity to network over lunch with current trainees and the Graduate Recruitment team – this was my chance to show all my efforts in terms of research and ask questions. I also managed to see a trainee I had spoken to at the Law Fair!

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Clifford Chance offices are at Canary Wharf, London

Finally, the day closed with a three hour workshop run by Mr. Luan De Burgh who is an absolute inspiration! The presentation/workshop was based on ‘Impact & Presence’ and the skills I gathered from this session are endless. This was extremely beneficial and potentially the most enjoyable session of the day! He is very, very talented and opened my eyes to what seemed simple, basic skills.

I did not think it was possible to learn so much in one day!

For more information about Clifford Chance open dayshttp://www.cliffordchancegraduates.com/work-experience/open-days/