The Fairs – from the inside, out…

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Written by Georgia Widdowson, Psychology placement student.

“Don’t miss the Part- time jobs fair tomorrow…”,
“Do you want to find a job whilst studying?”,
“Georgia, you don’t want to miss out…”

After receiving what feels like a life time of emails – similar to the above – promoting Job fairs, volunteering opportunities and undergraduate roles which will make us ‘more employable’ I thought, “Do you know what, I think I’ll take a rain check this year.”

Well, now I am kicking myself for closing a door to opportunities I had never opened my eyes to in the first place. I would always think “How is this actually going to help me? Companies won’t choose me. Employers won’t want to work around my busy University schedule.” But, I was wrong. Being on placement in the Careers Team has enabled me to experience University job fairs from the ‘inside’, where I have got my hands dirty with tasks. I now see why fairs are so important to get stand out work experience as a student. Attending a careers fair isn’t scary, its set up for us, SHU students.

Taking an undercover role as a staff member at SHU has forced me to take my fingers out my ears and listen to what employers can offer us. They DO want to help us. If I’d have never taken up a work placement role at the University careers and employability team, then the skills which I have learnt would still be buried under a towering pile of ‘denial’. I have uncovered abilities I’d never have the self-confidence to develop.

When I first arrived at my work placement, I was gobsmacked by how much work goes into the creation of job fairs for us students. The team do everything possible to help us and all the work that goes into fairs is solely with the benefit of students in mind. Without sounding biased the fairs amazing! Some quotes below from students at the recent Work While You Study Fairs can give you a bit of insight into exactly why job fairs are a must to attend…

            “Great variety and there a few companies here which I am definitely going to sign up to! There are opportunities here I didn’t think we could get involved with and get paid for.”

“Really good to be able to talk to employers in person as it’s easier to ‘sell’ yourself face to face rather than over your CV.”

            “It has been excellent! It made finding a job so easy! Everyone was really helpful.”

            “It was good because there are companies here that I wouldn’t think of applying for, so it was great to have some variety!”

These are just handful of student quotes which undoubtedly highlight how valuable, helpful, fun and eye-opening the careers fairs are!

However, I had to save the best until last…

            “We LOVE it! Loads of fun jobs and opportunities- I have signed up everywhere!”

This student was beaming like a Cheshire cat and was so enthusiastic and excited it was as if someone had told her she had landed a dream date. This really made me giggle and reminded me what exciting and interesting opportunities are handed to us at this University – we shouldn’t take them for granted!

So, when the next fairs come around,  don’t be a hermit and exchange Netflix for job finding. Find and drag yourself and your mates on campus and get involved! Whether this is talking to employers, taking leaflets or better yet, signing up to a job or volunteering opportunity! It doesn’t matter if you don’t find an opportunity; at least you got yourself out there! There’s no harm in trying and excelling yourself.

All I can think now is “I am so glad I decided to do a work placement! I’m a new ‘strong, independent woman’ who can achieve anything thrown her way!

Insight into publishing, my student perspective

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Kate Whittle, a first year BA English student at SHU recently attended an ‘Insight into Publishing’ event, run by Hachette UK, the UK’s most diversified trade publishing group.

“What are you doing at University?”, I sometimes get asked. Getting the most out of it, or at least trying to!

As a first-year student I initially felt a little out of my depth, I’d gotten up at half past four and travelled down to London for nine. I arrived at Carmelite House and thought “what am I doing here?”

Navigating the way to Hachette

However, within five minutes of being there I’d got a coffee in hand, a biscuit in the other and was making my way towards a table of smiling faces. Hachette UK put all the students into groups of about 8-10 to a table with a brief on it for a book, my table got the genre of ‘cookery books’ and so we had to brainstorm and work together to create a plan. This was so that throughout the day we could slowly work up a brief presentation where we attempt to sell our ‘book’ to the publishing house. This meant that everyone had to be friendly and work together to produce an original and interesting brief, they were some incredibly interesting people who I worked with and I honestly felt I learnt so much just from my table.

The day was split up by different talks from the different departments within the company, they had a director, Martin Neild who came and gave us an over view of the company and re-assured us that the book is definitely not dead! I think this causes a lot of people to not go into the industry and therefore they wanted to calm our fears and really get us enthusiastic about it. This was followed by some more senior staff who covered everything from production, to marketing, sales, publicity and so much more. To me the most striking thing about the day was just how broad the term ‘publishing’ is, it’s not just an editor and publicist doing all the work!

For example, Sarah Clay, the special sales person form Hodder & Stoughton made me realise that there is a lot more to getting the books on the shelfs past just writing and creating the physical book. She goes out to the major supermarkets, to the major bookstores, anywhere they think a book will sell. Her job role is to be enthusiastic and exited about why they would want this book in their stores, she said “it requires a lot of creative thinking and entrepreneurial spirit”. This made me realise I don’t have to use my love of books in a typical sense, I could use that love and enthusiasm to get other people into books!

Publishers names on wall by the lifts

Over all it was a truck load of information crammed into a 9-hour day. I left feeling a little overwhelmed but even more in love with books and the English language than before, I honestly think the day on a whole was a must for anyone who is even considering a job leading from English or to English. Its not just about the specifics of publishing but also the general knowledge and confidence you get from doing something out of your comfort zone, such as travelling to London alone and talking to people much older and much more experienced than yourself.

Hachette UK is an incredible company that provides opportunities to those attempting to get into the industry. The ‘Inside story’ event was perfect for me as a student to go and get a better idea of what it actually meant to go into Publishing and I wholeheartedly recommend it to any who can spare the day.

Insight into publishing

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Post by Laura Kerley, Employability Adviser for Humanities

I recently attended an ‘Insight into Publishing’ event, run by Hachette UK, the UK’s most diversified trade publishing group. The Hachette UK group includes many autonomous publishing companies, whilst providing some group level support. This combination of big and small proved a fascinating context to gain insight into the publishing industry.

Over the course of the day 60 students from across the UK heard from people working in a range of roles at Hachette and beyond. Speakers ranged from the very experienced (eg. the founder of inclusivity focused Dialogue Books ; and the literary agent of best seller ‘Girl on a Train’), to more recent graduates. But it wasn’t all chalk and talk. In groups, students were given a book genre and in between talks were set tasks to ultimately “create” a book and pitch it at the end of the day. This wasn’t as scary as it may sound – see our very own student view of the day from first year SHU English student, Kate Whittle. The day was rounded off nicely with drinks, socialising and a chance to get CV advice, with quite a backdrop view from the rooftop terrace!

Some key (and sometimes surprising) points about the publishing industry

  • It is thriving and the book isn’t dead!
  • There is an exciting array of roles available that are open to graduates from any subject. Although editing is critical (and popular), think beyond this to lesser known roles such as Design, Production, Rights&Licensing, Sales, Marketing&Publicity, Distribution and Finance.
  • There can be chances to work internationally, particularly in Sales and Rights&Licensing.
  • Competing for the ‘leisure pound’ with giants such as Amazon has led the industry to speed up, with distribution working at a particularly high pace.
  • There is no set path into the publishing industry. You can certainly spot some patterns (see tips below), but many atypical paths exist. One example is an Animation graduate turned Digital Marketing Manager with a background mainly in music promotion. Another is the founder of a Dialogue Books, who got there via bookselling/being a Production Runner/studying Politics&Anthropology as a mature student and more!

Tips to get into publishing

  • Be persistent in trying to get some industry experience via formal work experience/intern schemes and approaching publishers speculatively. However, extended periods of unpaid work experience/shadowing is not expected.
  • Paid work that is particularly valued is book selling and office experience outside the publishing industry. Blogging, using Twitter well and reading industry press are also valued.
  • Have an open mind about which work experience opportunities and entry level roles to go for. The less glamorous sounding will attract less competition and still be very useful experience.
  • Commercial awareness, organisation, team work and communication/negotiation skills are valued for all
  • When applying for opportunities don’t waste too much space telling the publishing company how awesome they are; tell them how you can help them be even more awseome!

 

How to find out more

Start by getting a fuller view of the publishing industry and roles on TARGETjobs; the Publishers Association and Creative Skillset.

Join the Society of Young Publishers (not just for young professionals – student membership is £24/yr); they run great events, an online advice forum, a magazine, a jobs database and more. They have a Northern branch that runs fantastic and reachable events.

Get some industry experience. Hachette UK run a work experience scheme and also Fresh Chapters internships. For other opportunities, follow publishers on Facebook/Twitter (the ‘Publishing’ list on @SHUCareersHums is a good place to start). Try a speculative approach with smaller publishers, including those outside London. For help with finding free accommodation for one week in London, visit the Spare Room Project. There is also help from the Book Trade Charity on offer for people looking to get into the industry.

REMEMBER, you can book an appointment with an Employability Adviser for practical support with job search and applications.

Everything you need to know before the Hallam Careers Fair

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Post by Sam Burton, BA Journalism student

Sam Burton

Employers from across the nation will be coming to Sheffield Hallam University next week for its first Careers Fair of the academic year.

A great opportunity to meet some leading employers and have a clearer view of what happens after university. To help you prepare Gradtime has all the details, expert tips, and trade secrets you need.

The fair will be at 11am – 3pm on Thursday 26th October. Almost 150 employers will fill several locations across the city campus including: The Careers & Employability Centre, Hallam Hall, Hallam Central, Heartspace, Cantor Building, and Hertha Ayrton Building.

“This will be an amazing chance to find out about a wide range of opportunities,” says Maggie Bamford – employability adviser for Photography, PR, Media and Journalism students. “They will be here to talk about graduate vacancies, placements and internships. You can find out about things you may already be interested in and also opportunities that you didn’t know existed.”

“There will be some recent graduates who were in the same position as you not so long ago, who are now working and can tell you about why they chose those companies and give advice about how to search for jobs and make successful applications.”

On the list of companies to impress at the fair is Asda, Royal Air Force, Citrix, IBM, Royal Mail, and many more organisations from across many industries.

For a full list of the companies attending, as well as directions to the fair click here.

“Build your confidence by speaking to employers who interest you less initially, and then approach your favourites”

According to Prospects.ac.uk, employers are most looking for leadership skills, good communication, planning and research skills, resilience, self-management, team working skills, and work experience.

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“A positive attitude, being polite and a friendly manner, all this and knowing something about the organisation is a huge advantage,” Bamford adds, “employers are interested in students, they are giving up their time and it costs them money to come here, so try to have something interesting to say to them.”

Before coming to the fair, Kent Roach, a careers and employability consultant at Hallam University, said students should “update their CVs and cover letters and prepare their elevator pitch. Just a 30-60 seconds speech on you, your key selling points and the role/sector you are interested in.”

And on the actual day “Present yourself well, dress comfortably but smart and professional. A smile, good eye contact and a hand shake is all you need to introduce yourself to an employer. A good starter is your name, year and subject. Tell them why you might want to work for them. Be ready with your elevator pitch”

If you don’t feel confident about approaching employers “build your confidence by speaking to employers who interest you less initially, and then approach your favourites,” said Bamford, “or attend preparatory events such as ‘I want to be more confident to talk to employers at the careers fairs’.”

You can search for workshops by clicking here.

Disability Confident Employers

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Disability Confident Employer

Sheffield Hallam University is proud to be a Disability Confident employer

Sheffield Hallam’s Careers and Employability Service recognises some of the employers taking action to increase diversity in their workforce

With over 31,000 students Sheffield Hallam University is the 7th largest university in the UK. We have a diverse student population that reflects the make- up of many major cities. It is essential therefore that we encourage employers who make a public commitment to reflect our diverse society in their workforce to attend our recruitment fair. One of these commitments is to the disability-confident-campaign

Ten of our visiting employers have pledged a commitment to their current and potential employees. An example of some pledges include – supporting positive and inclusive recruitment  –  being offered interviews. This is great news to the 12% of Sheffield Hallam students who have a long term medical condition or disability who feel encouraged to apply to such companies.

The ‘disability confident’ employers attending are: 3Squared, Dunelm (Soft Furnishings) Ltd, EY,Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, Millbrook Venues, PKF Cooper Parry, QHotels, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – Finance Department, Twinkl Educational Publishing. The Fair Guide for students will identify this charter.

Lisa Cameron from EY explains why it makes business sense for them to reflect and take action to support employees with disabilities.

Employers attending the recruitment Fair on 26th October can find out more about this scheme and others that help promote diversity in employment from the Careers and Employability Service.

Karen Allan, Sheffield Careers and Employability Service 16/10/17

Students wowing employers amongst other visitors at the Sheffield Hallam Nutrition Fair

by Karen Allan, Careers and Employability Service

The Nutrition Fair organised by Sheffield Business School’s Nutrition course leader Anna Hall is in its 13th year and was held last month at the university. The creativity and knowledge on show from the students this year was outstanding and more than kept up the reputation from previous years. The fair is a regular feature in the calendar of visitors from Totley Primary school and now it is becoming a fixture for employers keen to attract these talented students.

Karen Allan, Employability Adviser at Sheffield Hallam contributes to the list of companies invited to the event. Students who are keen to speak with employers are asked to submit their contact details to Karen beforehand.

She said: “I then supply the companies with a list of potential candidates and their stall number. This resulted in a number of conversations and offers of follow up meetings. Fairs like this are much more interesting for employers who are looking for people with specific knowledge and skills. They get the chance to see students in action, such as advising the public about nutrition issues, explaining health benefits and explaining the ideas behind their product development.”

Leading from the front and an eager attendee on the day was Sheffield Hallam University Vice Chancellor Professor Chris Husbands who commented on how the content of the day had made all attendees reflect on diet and nutrition.

He said: “The Nutrition Fair was great fun – engaging, informative and revealing, whatever your previous knowledge about foods and nutrition. It made me think hard, and it made the pupils from local schools who had been invited think hard about diet and nutrition. It covered so many bases: challenging established wisdom, inventive and imaginative and reaching out to diverse audiences.”

Sheffield Hallam Vice Chancellor, Chris Husbands

Sheffield Hallam Vice Chancellor, Chris Husbands attended the Nutrition Fair

Tom Balchin of Barker Ross Food attended the Nutrition Fair and said: “Myself and my colleague Harley attended the Nutrition Fair 2017 at Sheffield Hallam University recently and left feeling more than impressed. We made our way around each project, enticed by the amazing products they had put together and the thought process behind it.

Tom Balchin

Tom Balchin

“It was clear all students had taken a real insight into current market trends and thought about what consumers want. All students were approachable, enthusiastic and knowledgeable. I learnt things from each project with a vast array of handouts for me to take home (including some great recipe cards!)

“A fantastic selection of students with bright futures ahead, great to meet the next generation of professionals within the industry and we will 100% be back next year!”

Thomas Tucker Ltd. will be holding a graduate recruitment event based on the presentations at the event. Gary Durant, Finance & HR Manager added: “This was a true insight in to the calibre of up and coming talented food professionals and we are looking forward to working with the university and its students later in the year.”

Here are some pictures of the fabulous projects on show

Elise Ollerenshaw advising the public

Elise Ollerenshaw advising the public

Pupils from Totley Primary School, Sheffield

Pupils from Totley Primary School, Sheffield

 

 

 

 

 

 

Esther Smith, Freya Harrop, Hannah Van Hest Callender. "Don't Berry your Head" won the prize for most innovative stall sponsored by food ingredient specialists Ulrick and Short.

Esther Smith, Freya Harrop, Hannah Van Hest Callender. “Don’t Berry your Head” won the prize for most innovative stall sponsored by food ingredient specialists Ulrick and Short.

Kamila Bashir and Shumila Hassan

Kamila Bashir and Shumila Hassan

For more information about the Nutrition Fair, please email: k.allan@shu.ac.uk

Guinevere shares her top tips on gaining a Tier 2 sponsored Graduate role in the UK

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The Careers and Employability service provides students and graduates help with careers advice, CV writing, application forms, mock interviews, assessment centres, psychometric testing, skills workshops as well as in class lectures as part of your course. 

Students are also able to access a dedicated Employability Adviser as well as a Careers Consultant dedicated to their course.

Guinevere Chan (Sze Kei Chan), International graduate in MSc International Business Management and was able to fully utilise these services during her time at Sheffield Hallam University.

We spoke to Guinevere recently where she updated us on how she’s progressing after graduating and her current role at PriceWaterhouseCoopers.

Guinevere Chan (second right) whilst working at the ICE club.

Guinevere Chan (second right) whilst working at the ICE club.

What made you choose to study your courses?

I chose to study a MSc programme in International Business Management at Sheffield Hallam mainly because I developed an interest in different cultures and how these differences have an impact on the interactions between people and businesses. As I was undertaking a Business and Human Resource Management course at the time, I quickly realised that I would be interested to deepen my business knowledge with an international focus.

What were your experiences of each course?

I really enjoyed being part of the course for three main reasons.  First of all, the course is highly practical and we were constantly given the opportunity to apply theories and models to real life business cases, in the form of analysis, reports and presentations.  Secondly, the academic staff always challenged us to think critically from different perspectives. I found that having such a mind-set has been very useful in my current job. Finally, the people who are on the course are from a range of different cultural backgrounds, which I thoroughly enjoyed and I made really good friends who I still keep in touch with today.

How did you adjust to living in Sheffield?

I also completed my undergraduate degree at Sheffield Hallam so I was already familiar with the city when I joined the master’s course. However, it was quite difficult at the beginning when I first came to the UK. The main reasons were the different education systems, cultural difference and not knowing anyone in the city.

In comparison to the Hong Kong education system, the biggest differences I found in the UK was the emphasis on autonomy in learning, critical thinking and practical applications. It seemed to me that the higher level of the qualification, the more these aspects apply to my study. 

So for new students coming from Hong Kong and China, be prepared to:

  • Be a lot more involved in expressing your own opinions in class
  • Challenge other perspectives and be prepared to being challenged
  • Take responsibility for your own learning progress
  • Take part in group work
  • Take initiative (e.g. be a course rep)
  • Take a leadership role (e.g. leader of a group project)
  • Read quality news regularly to keep up to date with what is happening (e.g. BBC News, Financial Times, Guardian)
  • Develop your skill set outside the classroom through engaging with extracurricular activities
Guinevere appeared in marketing material for the university during her time in Sheffield

Guinevere appeared in marketing material for the university during her time in Sheffield with hints and tips for other students.

Did anything help you to adjust to UK life?

Yes, definitely. I adapted to the new city very quickly as I built my circle through taking part in the social activities at Sheffield Hallam. As time progressed, I also started to volunteer to participate in different projects and societies, through which I expanded my social circle and sharpened my skills at the same time. My favourite social activities were the day trips that are organised by the International Experience Team as I was able to travel and see more of the UK and meet new people at the same time.

Did you do any part time work whilst in the UK?

I did. I started off working in the ICE club at the university which is part of the University’s Campus Jobs (paid roles to work for the university) and later I also worked at a retail store called Argos during the summer months.

You have recently gained a Graduate role. Tell us more about this.

Company: Price Waterhouse Coopers. Role title: Associate Management Consultant

My role is part of a two year graduate scheme, in which I will have the opportunity to experience a range of different projects. My responsibilities are varied depending on the projects but a few examples would be conducting market research to identify potential clients and opportunities for  the company; and assisting in designing and implementing sustainable transformation programmes for our clients.

Can you outline some of the support you received during your course from the various parts of the University?

During my four years at Sheffield Hallam, I received a lot of support from different people. The tutors helped to shape my thinking and always challenged me to achieve more than I thought I could be. The Careers Consultants and Employability Advisers helped me to build my CV and helped me to understand the steps that I needed to take to secure a job in the UK. I believe that the understanding of the UK job market is absolutely critical to landing a job as an international student. As for the International Experience Team, they offered an excellent visa advice service which helped me to understand the various types of Visas that I would need to obtain to work in the UK after graduation. Finally, taking part in the ICE club and other volunteering opportunities helped me to develop my communication skills, confidence, English language capability and to expand my network, which was also critical to my path in landing a graduate job in the UK with Tier 2 sponsorship.

What advice do you have for any other international students who are seeking a placement or graduate role in the UK?

To the international students who are looking for a placement or a graduate role in the UK, my advice would be plan ahead, make good use of the services on offer from the Careers and Employability centre, take part in extracurricular activities and gain a good understanding of the UK job market.

Here are some questions I recommend to you to get your thinking started:

  • What roles and in what industry you are interested in and what skills are required for those roles?
  • What kind of experiences or opportunities do you have access to right now that can help you develop those skills? (Such as volunteering, societies, part time work, internships.. etc)
  • What do you know about the job market that you are interested in? (Such as who are the major companies that sponsor work visas in the UK or elsewhere, what are their recruitment processes.. etc)
  • Why do you want to find a job in the UK and are you prepared to go through some of the vigorous recruitment processes involved?

All in all, landing a job in the UK as an international student can be very challenging. However, it is definitely not impossible as long as you are willing to put in great effort for preparations. If there is one thing that I want you to take away from this, it would be: Prepare, prepare and prepare!

Anything else you want to add?

I wish I had known that everything will work out eventually, and that I shouldn’t put too much stress on myself. 

Come to our careers fair on Thursday 23rd March

With our Spring Fair taking place on Thursday 23rd March, this is your chance to meet with dozens of local, national and international employers who are offering graduate recruitment, internship and placement opportunities.

If you want to hear five great reasons why you should attend our careers fair, have a look at the video below:

To book your attendance at the fair, please click here.

If you’re already attending, then here’s some great student tips on how to prepare for the fair!

We look forward to seeing you on Thursday 23rd March between 11am – 3pm in Hallam Hall and the Careers and Employability Centre.

How I won a £160,000 award competition for my graduate employer

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Post by 2015 BA (Hons) Marketing graduate, Liam Soloman (Marketing Executive at lovethesales.com)

Liam Soloman with the award#TEASELONDON was a Twitter competition specifically aimed at UK start-ups for London’s Technology Week. Run by a digital software company Eyetease and partnering company Verifone UK (who creat the digital advertising boards on top of London’s black cabs).

The winner would receive £160,000 worth of advertising on 200 black cabs in London. The challenge, to tweet in the reason why you think Londoner’s need to know about your start-up.

Since finding the competition through social media, I was given the amazing opportunity to come up with an entry for my employer, Lovethesales.com, and submit it through our Twitter page, using the #TEASELONDON.

Step 1 | Research

I dedicated a few hours a week looking into both Eyetease and Verifone UK, searching through press publications, previous campaigns they did with other companies to get as much background information about what they would be looking for and what type of company impressed them.

By taking note of the other entries in the competition, it appeared most start-ups didn’t fully grasp the brief given by Eyetease. Most entries tried to sell their brand, using impressive stats and numbers or pitching why their company were amazing, very much an X Factor style of entry.

Through the research and evaluation of competitor entries, I found that our best chance of winning was not showing how great our company is (which is difficult with only 127 characters) but to try and show how our advertising on their taxis can benefit different demographics on Londoner’s.

Step 2 | Implementation

I came up with a series of situations in the form of pictures, where different types of Londoner’s would need our business (see pictures of entries below). A student needing a laptop but not being able to afford paying fullprice, a mum busy with her kids not having time to go out to shop, or a girl desiring a designer dress in a shop window but finding it to be out of her budget.

In the corner of each picture I put one of Verifone UK’s black cabs with a digital advertising board on top. On the board would be a personalised lovethesale.com ad for each scenario.SLIDE

This was a succinct way of showing how we could be helpful to everyday Londoner’s whilst using an example of what it would actually look like on their black cabs, which no other entry had thought of yet.

Step 3 | Finalists

The entrants were shortlisted to 5 start-ups who would meet with the owner of Eyetease for a 15 min discussion followed by a Q&A.

There was no presentation needed, however I along with my two bosses took the initiative to create a few slides fleshing out the key points as to why we thought Lovethesales.com would work really well with their company, pointing to how we can help Londoner’s “shop more, spend less” (our company slogan).

Eyetease were extremely impressed with our initiative, eagerness and passion for what we do. Along with a few stats on Lovethesales.com’s current progression and a few anecdotes about its inception, we were delighted to be announced at London Technology week as the winners of such a mind boggling prize.

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Step 4 | What’s next?

Over the next few months I will be involved in putting together a 4-week campaign that will run over 200 black cabs in geo-targeted London locations. We expect the competition to increase traffic to the site and dramatically improve our brand awareness.

Being able to take the lead on this crucial campaign was a great feeling and one that I don’t think I would’ve been given working in a large corporate environment. The added bonus of actually winning gives me a fantastic story for my CV and great experience going forward in my future career.

I would highly recommend anyone in their first job to constantly ask their superiors for more responsibility, always be eager to take on new challenges and never be afraid of failing at a task as there is always something to learn from.

Calling all Psychology, Sociology, Politics and Criminology students!

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Degree+ Career Talks are for students on Psychology, Sociology, Politics and Criminology courses, and are aimed at giving you an insight into a range of careers. Many of the talks will be by external speakers – professionals with direct experience of these varied career areas. Booking is essential, go to shuspace>employability>events.

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The full programme is here:

Working in the Charity Sector Mon 2nd Feb, 2pm- 3pm

Careers and Employability Centre, City

Routes into Teaching aimed at L4 and L5 students Thursday 5th Feb, 11-12pm

Main Building, D011

 

Routes into Nursing

with nurse and course leader David Wood

Wed 11th Feb, 1pm – 2pm

Main Building, D011

 

Routes into Social Work

with social worker Lee Pollard

Mon 16th Feb, 1- 2.30

Main Building, D104

 

Non-Teaching Roles in Education Thurs 19th Feb 11-12.30

Heart of Campus HC 0.15

Forensic Psychology and related careers with guest speakers Mon 23rd Feb, 12noon – 1pm

Main Building, D008

From Social Sciences to Business with SHU Politics graduate Sam Douglas-Cregan Friday 27th Feb, 1pm – 2pm

Main Building D007

Routes into Journalism  with Philo Holland, Radio 5 Live Broadcast Journalist Mon 2pm Feb, 12-1pm

Careers and Employability Centre, City

 

Careers in Mental Health Services with employers Cambian, St Andrews, Alpha Hospitals Tues 3rd March,3- 4.30pm

Heart of Campus 0.29

Working with Young People at risk of Sexual Exploitation Mon 9th March, 4pm – 5pm

Heart of Campus, HC0.29

 

Routes into Counselling with guest speakers

 

Thurs 19th March, 4pm – 5.30

Main Building D014

 

Working for an MP, Supporting People with Substance Misuse Issues

 

 
To be confirmed