What are your work values and why are they important?

Values are qualities considered to be the most important guiding principles that help set priorities in your career and life. They are highly personal and define what is purposeful and meaningful to you. Though values may change in response to life circumstances, they are generally thought to be enduring and provide a compass for setting goals and making decisions.

Identifying your values can help you identify what activities and environment you might enjoy working in, focus your career aims and understand the motivators that might drive your career choice

Would earning a lot of money make you happy? Despite the phrase, “money makes the world go around” it generally doesn’t lead to job satisfaction. It’s important to consider what you enjoy and what you want from a career while thinking about your future.

Values are the things that are really important to you. They are also the things which are important to organisations and you may see them proclaimed on websites. Many organisations are beginning to recruit people who seem to have values which are in line with theirs.

Here are some examples of things you may value:- Creativity – Autonomy – Justice – Fun – Achievement – Using skills – Continuous learning – Security – Work-Life balance – Money – Status

Some values are likely to be more important to you than others so that, for example, you may be willing to sacrifice ‘security’ in a job for ‘creativity’.

Finding a job which suits you can help to give you job satisfaction and feel happier.

Imagine going to work every day and feeling proud of what you achieve. You are doing something that is important to you and you strongly believe it is worthwhile. You feel at home in your workplace and it’s as if the job were made just for you.

Faith, Hope and (working for a) Charity….. 

Eddie Smith  BSc Mathematics graduate shares his experience of looking for a role in the third sector

As a Christian, I believe that God has called me to leave a positive impact on the world. It is my belief that this calling applies in all aspects of my life, and so when looking for and applying for graduate jobs, it was important to me that this should reflect these values. I decided to focus my search on the third sector. Christians Against Poverty was a charity I had been aware of for a while, and so one day I went onto their website to see if they had any vacancies. It was then that I first heard about their internship and upon application I was successful.

The internship first appealed to me because it will give me valuable experience in an innovative charity (which has made numerous appearances on lists of best charities to work for) and will set me in good stead for a career in the third sector which is my ultimate goal. An internship role rather than a regular job attracted me because of the additional support that will be available throughout the year. This is important to me because I am aware that the leap between full-time study and the working world is large and is something I am somewhat apprehensive about. The goal of Christians Against Poverty is to free people in the UK from the grip of poverty and debt. I will be working as an intern in the Debt Operations team, putting together payment plans and negotiating repayments. This role will enable me to use the skills developed as part of my mathematics degree, whilst helping people and making a positive impact on the lives of those most in need.”

Eddie commences as a graduate intern with Christians Against Poverty on September 3rd.

To explore your values why not have a go at an online questionnaire

 

 

Student entrepreneur celebrates national award success

Featured

A budding young entrepreneur and SHU student who set up his own IT company at the age of 15 has won a national business award.

Harvey Morton, aged 20, from Woodseats, Sheffield, was named Young Freelancer of the Year in the IPSE – Association of Independent Professionals and the Self-Employed – competition.

Harvey juggles the demands of running his home-based IT consultancy full time with his studies at Sheffield Business School, where he has just completed the second year of his BA in Business and Enterprise Management.

He said: “It was a complete surprise when they announced that I was the winner. I still feel quite overwhelmed. It’s a national title and I have had a lot of attention since and I’m not really used to anything on that scale. To be recognised nationally is huge, really.”

Harvey won £3,000 prize money, champagne and a year’s membership of IPSE, which entitles him to free business support.

His firm Harvey Morton IT support (www.harveymorton-itsupport.com) offers a range of services including social media management, web design, app development and media production.

Harvey, who was nominated for the prize by Sheffield Hallam University’s Enterprise team,  is no stranger to award success.

At the age of 15, he set up an on-call IT support firm and later won enterprise prizes while still at school studying for his GCSEs. The firm has grown into a digital marketing agency with clients all around the UK, including The Cutler’s Company, Alton Towers and The Princes Trust.

Harvey said he had no plans to go to university but received help from business experts in Sheffield Hallam’s Enterprise team and after meeting other students decided to take the plunge. He said: “One of the reasons I was attracted to Sheffield Hallam was because I met people studying on the business courses at SHU and I could see how much they enjoyed it. Before that, I had never thought of going to university.”

“I have learnt so many skills which have helped me to run my business – financial management, HR, how to write a proper business plan, customer service skills, and a lot of the theory has helped with the practical element of running my business,” he said.

“The support I’ve received from the Enterprise Team has been outstanding.

“I feel privileged to have been able to access an amazing team of mentors who have given me valuable advice and have helped me to grow my business alongside my studies at Hallam.

“It’s been great to meet so many like-minded people at the university who are also self-employed. To anyone who is thinking of setting up a business whilst at Hallam, do it! The Enterprise Team will support you along the way and it’s a great way to make new friends.”

Caroline Nouvellon enterprise manager at SHU, said: “It has been an absolute privilege to support Harvey in his business venture over the past couple of years. He encapsulates the extraordinary entrepreneurial flair and mindset of many Hallam students and graduates and has been a wonderful ambassador for the Enterprise Team.

“He is a thoroughly deserving recipient of the ISPSE Young Freelancers of the Year Award and we look forward to working with him in the future to ensure the long-term sustainability of his business within the Sheffield City Region.”

Digital Ambassador wins national student employee of the year award

Featured

Ellie Wright, aged 21, can now add winner of the Student Employee Of The Year (SEOTY) award to her growing list of achievements.

The recent English Language graduate was honoured on Thursday evening at a conference in Cardiff, for going above and beyond whilst working part-time for the university’s marketing department.

Ellie, who worked primarily as a digital student ambassador was nominated for the national award for her strong work ethic and her ability to connect online with prospective students about the merits of studying at Sheffield Hallam.

“Ellie has a natural way of illustrating her student life without coming across as a cliché or being over enthusiastic. She is honest, open and authentic. She was always enthusiastic about helping us and very willing to share every ounce of her story,” said Laura Lightfinch, senior marketing officer at SHU, who nominated Ellie for the award.

Each year, university employers are given the opportunity to nominate exceptional student workers who combine study with paid part-time work for the National Association of Student Employment services’ SEOTY Award. The national competition has surged in popularity since its inception in 1998.

This year, Ellie stood-out, despite the roughly 700 nominations that were submitted from over 30 Higher Education Institutions across the country. Ellie competed against all the winners within the North East region (which includes Universities across Yorkshire and the North East) and was chosen as a regional winner. She was then invited to join all the other regional winners, at the national awards ceremony last night in Cardiff where she won the overall competition.

“I was so excited to win the award because so many other deserving students had been nominated too. Working with Sheffield Hallam has been the best opportunity I’ve taken at university and winning this award really highlights how much I’ve been able to do and learn whilst working and studying,” she said.

Ellie, who was already an advocate for the university says the opportunity gave her more confidence to share her insights about ‘The Hallam Experience’ as well as strengthening her marketing skills and knowledge.

“I’m really grateful to have been awarded this achievement to end my time at uni in such a positive way,” she added.

A second Hallam student Leyana Akbani, who is studying at Sheffield Business School, was also a winner at both the regional and national SEOTY 2018 awards. At the conference in Cardiff, Leyana was award the national Highly Commended Commercial Impact Award.

“Internships boosted my confidence and I’m 100% more prepared for the job I want”

Featured

Many students and graduates pursue internships to build experience, but have you considered the broad range of benefits that could be gained? I caught up with Creative Arts Practice graduate, Lydia Jackson, to get her perspective on how she gained her recent internships as part of the Hallam Internship Scheme. During her internships, Lydia acted as Exhibition Coordinator for Platform 18 at Sheffield Hallam Students Union and Assistant Exhibition Coordinator at Cupola Contemporary Art.

Why did you want to undertake an internship?

I came out of University not knowing what to do to start my career, all the jobs I found required experience which I didn’t have. These internships make such a fantastic transition from the comfort of the university to the big wide world of jobs. They’re a great chance to get a feel for a job you like the sound of and for me they have changed my path to what I want as a career; they boosted confidence and give me a world of experience within my field and I now know what I want to do as a career and feel I’m 100% more prepared for the job I want.

What do you think you have added to the business?

At SHSU, I joined the Platform 18 team with a wealth of knowledge and experience in exhibitions, having done so many on my degree and being a selected artist in the previous Platform 17 exhibition. So, I feel I added knowledge to the team in what is required for an exhibition. I’m also a very organised person which was a very important aspect to have when coordinating an event like this, so I added further method to the exhibition. As a young artist fresh from a degree, I was very adaptable to the busy gallery life that Cupola was. I went in everyday with a new task to do and I believe I did so efficiently and rose to everything I was asked to do. I also had great input into their social media posts and adapted to their style of social media to encourage customers.

What has been the biggest surprise whilst completing your internship?

With both, I was very impressed with how capable I became, not only with the pressures of organising an exhibition and working in a busy gallery but using my initiative to think or do things before I was asked. I became independent in both of my internships quickly and made sure I fit in with my new surroundings and colleagues. I’m surprised with how much I’ve grown in such a short space of time and how much more confident I have become both personally and professionally.

What is the most exciting thing you did as part of your internship?

Working on the Platform Exhibition it was amazing how much responsibility they gave me and how much they valued my input. I think when you hear the term intern you expect to be treated differently as a junior, but it was really exciting to be treat as a valued part of the team and trusted so much. I became a vital part of the exhibition process and I think rising to that and having the attitude that you are part of the team and not just an intern really helped me with this. Overall the most amazing thing is that I’ve organised an exhibition that was in the Millennium Galleries that feels like such a big achievement for me. Another exciting aspect that these internships gave me was being asked to be a panellist at the ‘get_in there’, which is run by Sheffield Creative Guild, Sheffield Hallam Students’ Union and the university and attracted over 100 people. It was so amazing to be considered for this and realise how valued my opinion was, giving advice to people just about to graduate who were in my position. This was also great for me as I don’t consider myself a confident public speaker and doing this just helps me evolve in an area I want to improve.

What have you gained from your internship experience?

The confidence aspect is huge for me, It was so amazing to be there with the crowd when the doors first opened on launch day for Platform 18 – being told how well I had done and being thanked for all my hard work in the opening speech and by attendee’s at the exhibition was such a highlight for me, having been there through all the organising and finally seeing that come to fruition was incredible. Not only that, I’ve gained a lot of contacts through my internships and networking events that will be valuable to me from a professional and art world perspective.

Would you recommend an internship to current students?

100% yes! When I left university, I was thrown into this world and was unsure what to do, I was very persistent with wanting to achieve a career in the arts. I constantly sought advice and kept asking for help from the careers department at Hallam and it really paid off. Although I was unsure about what I specifically wanted to do, I was given great direction and now I know what I want to do with my career and I’m excited for my next steps.

Thank you, Lydia, for taking the time to share your experiences.

If you’re a student or graduate seeking an internship, I encourage you to search for opportunities via UniHub and to have a chat with your employability adviser if you’d like further advice.

Top 3 web pages all our fashion students should read!

Featured

Getting a foot in the door of the fashion industry can be daunting. It’s an extremely competitive world which requires creativity, an ability to work alongside strategists and keep up with rapidly changing trends whilst engaging with a demanding client base always on the look-out for new and exciting creations.

That being said, fashion can be a very exciting and fulfilling career option for graduates whose love for the fashion industry is only paralleled by their determination to leave their mark on it.

Whether you’re just about to join us in Sheffield, or you’re about to graduate and are currently setting up this year’s Degree Show Fashion Show, here’s our top 3 web pages every Hallam Fashion student should read!

Number 1: Work Experience and Networking in the Fashion Industry

Summary: Work experience is crucial for entering the fashion industry and can take the form of internships, volunteering, placements, work shadowing or part-time work.

Number 2: Becoming a Freelance Fashion Designer 

Summary: It is extremely common for people working in the creative sector to be self-employed either full-time or on a part-time basis whilst combining it with employed work; the latter is known as a portfolio career. Designers tend to be independent, creative thinkers and are often self-employed and/or in occupations involving project work and short-term contracts with both small and large organisations.

Number 3: Finding and Applying for Jobs in Fashion

Speculative approaches are generally more effective ways to find jobs in the design/arts industries.  A speculative application involves approaching a company about the possibility of working for them rather than applying to an advertised vacancy. It could be an effective way to bypass the huge number of applications that any individual company may receive to one advertised vacancy. Also, remember that many SMEs (small-medium sized companies) very rarely advertise vacancies as they receive sufficient speculative applications to recruit in this way.  Fashion directories can provide a list of companies to approach!

 

 

“I wouldn’t have a job in the Criminal Justice Sector without volunteering!”

Featured

Olivia, Criminology & Psychology graduate, is now a Case Worker at Remedi, where she initially volunteered as a student. For more information about Remedi, and their work in restorative justice, visit  www.remediuk.org/

Hi Olivia, how did you get involved with Remedi?

I had a meeting with Sheryl, my Employability Adviser, and after talking about my interests she suggested that I contact Remedi to enquire about volunteering. The Derbyshire team offered me three sessions a week working on the Victim Support Programme.  I was responsible for making telephone contact with victims of all different types of crime and offering them help and support.

After about 5 or 6 months Remedi offered me some paid work on a temporary basis and then in June 2017 I was offered a permanent job on the Restorative Justice project!

Tell me a little bit about your current role

There are two strands to my job; one with young offenders and the other with adults. In my work with young offenders, I deal with people who have been referred from the Youth Justice Panels.  We have one-to-one sessions based around their conviction and we might do things like sending a letter of apology to the victim.  I also get to sit on Youth Justice Panels, which means I get to be part of the decision making process about what happens to an offender.

On the adult side my referrals come from Witness Care; if a victim shows an interest in restorative justice they are passed onto me and I make contact with both parties. Initially, I meet with the victim and the offender separately and then we decide what happens from there.

How did your degree prepare you for this role?

When I first started there was a lot of training based around theories of psychology and I was already familiar with most of it. Also, my degree gave me prior knowledge of community sentencing and the terminology used in Youth Justice Panels

What is the best part of your job?

I really like working with young people, and if I’d not volunteered I don’t think I would have considered it as a career option

What do you see yourself doing next?

More work with young people, maybe Case Management with young offenders

What advice would you give to new students starting at Hallam this semester?

Start volunteering in your first year! I left it until my final year and it was really difficult to fit around my academic study.

Thanks Olivia!

Sheffield Hallam Law students visit Magic Circle law firm!

Law students, Ellie Wilson and Ryan Wheatley, recently attended the Clifford Chance Open Day as part of the University Alliance programme.  These are their thoughts on the day:

EllieAfter my train being cancelled and a busy morning running around London trying to find the office I finally arrived at Clifford Chance. The graduate team were very friendly and made us feel very welcome with a lovely breakfast whilst we got to know each other. Our first session involved a talk from one of the partners about the firm and her career. This gave us an idea about the work that Clifford Chance do day to day and the successful clients that they work with. The graduate recruitment team then talked us through the application process and gave us some advice about applying for training contracts. Following this we enjoyed a networking lunch with the firm’s trainees and chatted to the head of graduate talent about the do’s and don’ts of the application process. After a tour of the office we learnt about the process of an international transaction and we had a seminar about the process of mergers and acquisitions. Going to the open day gave me a better understanding of how a commercial law firm works and gave me an insight into how commercial law works in practice. I thoroughly enjoyed the day and am very grateful that I was given the opportunity to visit a magic circle law firm.

Ryan – The day began with a tour of the Clifford Chance head office in Canary Wharf London, there were approximately twenty people in attendance from different universities. The day was very well structured and very informative, we were welcomed by a senior partner and member of the graduate recruitment day who ran through the basics of the firm and what they looked for in terms of recruitment and progression of trainees. Following this, there was a very useful networking session with current trainees of Clifford chance, they were more than happy to ask about us and inform us on how to make the best of the application process. I was particularly impressed with how interested the current trainees were with participants of such days and were more than happy to pass on contact details and tips for applications, not only at Clifford Chance, but at any firm. The day resulted with a workshop focusing on the timeline of an acquisition process which was very interesting and gave an insight to the law in which they specialise. Overall the day was very informative and interesting, and I would recommend this sort of experience to anyone with the opportunity.

9 Tips for Job Interviews

Featured

Post by Laura Burden, final year student at Hallam

So if, like me, you’re coming to the end of your time studying at Sheffield Hallam, you’re probably starting to think about getting one of those job things. I’ve had a few job interviews recently; I wanted to share some of my experiences and tips.

Let’s assume, for the purpose of this post, that you’ve secured an interview. Pat yourself on the back because that in itself isn’t easy. Clearly, there’s something in your application that they like!

So here’s a bit of a roundup of what I do before, during and after a job interview.

Research the company/organisation

No matter what I know about an organisation, I do a sweep of all the interview and job description information I’ve had and make notes. Then a quick Google search and a poke around their website provides some more general information about the company.

It’s all useful to know and trust me; it’s really obvious when you’ve done your research.

Know where you’re going and who you’re meeting

If I’m not sure where I’m going I do as much research as possible about the place I’ll be going to for my interview – is there parking available, what time will the train arrive there, what if the train’s late?

I’ve arrived more than an hour early for an interview before because I was nervous about being late, thankfully there was somewhere nearby where I could have a coffee. Try to arrive no more than 15 minutes early.

Have you got everything?

Typically you’ll need to bring some ID with you such as a passport. You might also need proof of any qualifications you mentioned on your application so, don’t forget your certificates. I also like to have some water with me (although it’s usually provided in interviews) and some pens and paper. Make sure to check the interview information and see whether you need to do any prep, in the past I’ve had to prepare a presentation and take it with me.

What type of interview is it?

I’ve been to group interviews, presentation interviews, panel interviews and one-to-one interviews; it just depends on the organisation, department and specific role you’re applying for. Each interview type has its pros and cons, usually I find it less nerve-wracking if there’s more than one person interviewing but really it depends on the people! It’s always important to know what type of interview you’re going to, and try to find out the name/s of the interviewers.

First impressions are vital

I know it’s a cliché but it’s true.

Dress smartly (yes, you have to iron your shirt), smile, introduce yourself, shake hands with your interviewers, please and thank you etc. Don’t sit down until a seat is offered, sit up straight, listen to your interviewers carefully and ask for clarification if you’re unsure about something.

Make eye contact and nod or respond where appropriate. Address the person who has asked you the question but also make eye contact with the other members of the panel.

The questions

Top tip – have a look at the job specification; you can usually work out what kind of questions you’ll get. I’ve had questions on personal strengths and weaknesses, working through a difficult situation, why I would be suitable for the role, and everything in between.

I definitely recommend having a couple of examples of situations you’ve been in and do some personal reflection.

If you’re struggling to think of the best example to use or how to answer a question, ask if you can come back to it. I’ve done this a few times – they aren’t judging you for it.

STAR

The most important thing to remember for interviews – use the STAR technique.

I’m really bad for waffling and trying to cram in a lot of information – have you noticed? The STAR technique helps me give focused, concise answers.

Situation – Who, what, when, where and why

Task – What was the challenge or problem, what was the end goal?

Action – What did YOU do?

Result – What was the outcome?

Ask your own questions

Always ask at least one question yourself. It shows you’re interested – in the job, the company, the people sat in front of you. Rather than trying to think something up on the spot, I tend to go with a few questions in mind, and then whatever isn’t answered; you’ve got some questions to hand.

Just make sure you don’t ask anything that’s already been answered.

After the interview

Before you leave, make sure they have your contact details and that you know when they will contact you. When they do get in touch, I make sure to thank them for their time and for contacting me, I also always ask for feedback on my interview – even if I’m offered the position.

If you need to take a day to consider a job offer, don’t be afraid to ask for some time. Remember, even though a job offer over the phone is brilliant, it’s not binding, and it’s important to ensure you get some kind of written offer.

Good luck out there and remember to check out the Careers Central Interviews page for more advice, tips and to book a mock interview if you’re feeling unprepared or unsure!

Recognition and relationships

Featured

Post by James Beighton, Employer Partnerships Officer (Student Employment) at Sheffield Hallam University

There’s an age-old saying “Self-praise is no recommendation.” Proverbs have to start somewhere so at some point, somebody must’ve been willing to shout about their success and it must’ve meant something to someone.

Last week we crowned institutional winners of The Sheffield Hallam University Student Employee of The Year Awards (SEOTY). The Awards themselves are the largest of their kind in the UK and recognise students who successfully combine part-time work with study. 81 of our students were put forward as nominees by their Manager for going above and beyond their job duties, showing leadership or having a commercial impact on a local or national business.

Sheffield once again sits at the top of the table for student employment with the city’s two Universities finishing 2nd and 3rd in the overall nominations table for 2018.

What does this mean for our students? For some, I dare say most, a job fits one purpose, an income alongside study. This year, more than any other, our students are starting to reflect on the skills they are taking from employment. We’ve heard about the competitive job market, being work ready as a graduate, being tech-savvy and digitally orientated. What is refreshing is the way that all our winners reflected on their achievements in their victory speech, with confidence and humility. Soft skills will take you far.

The labour market is increasingly consumer driven. The 2018 employer is open to those with portfolio careers and it’s accepted that stand out workers will likely have exposure to different sectors, jobs and skill sets. Yorkshire’s rich list was released by The Times Newspaper last week and emphasised the trend that fortune is increasingly self-made. The rise to wealth of those setting up their own business or believing in an idea is stark. Proof, if ever it was needed, that graduates will go far with belief and resilience, two distinguishing factors amongst those who work part-time and those who work part-time with distinction.

It is possible to have an impact working as little as 8 to 10 hours per week. Looking at this year’s SEOTY nominations, our students are proving to be a driving force behind some of the bigger issues facing the Higher Education Sector. Our Commercial Impact Award winner won her award for bringing an estimated £1 million of new business to a company specialising in mental health and wellbeing. The winner of the Above and Beyond Award is a true ambassador, promoting the value of getting into further education amongst school children through sports coaching in the community. The ability of our students to apply themselves through part-time work and champion their own experience of higher education is admirable.

Work experience is as much a part of an education as learning a system or reading a textbook. It allows students to build relationships on a professional level and the confidence gained from seeing the reward in working is markable. Our students have to work, it’s no longer a desirable.

On campus, our student casual payroll paid 402 individual students last month. Between them, these students worked over 4000 hours in paid part-time work, working for teams on campus at Sheffield Hallam University. The demand for work is on the increase and through initiatives like SEOTY, the importance of a successful working partnership between students and employers is becoming ever more prominent.

The 2017 national SEOTY winner is a Sheffield Hallam student. At the time, 1st year Law student Nabeela stood out as a clear winner for her work with young people as part of The National Citizen Service (NCS) programme. Students are leading by example and working as advocates for the importance of getting out there and doing something meaningful. They may not identify it at the outset but they are resilient in a time where it’s easy to become insular in an uncertain political and financial labour market. Nabeela featured via video at our awards evening and summed up exactly what a SEOTY Award can do for the confidence of a student, “When I went to interviews I was able to say, I’m student employee of the year, hire me!”. A stand out example that work experience at any level of study is valuable both to the individual and a business.

The SEOTY Awards are now at a regional stage where winners from institutional awards will compete across the country to be named as National Student Employee of The Year 2018.

Winners will be announced at The National Association of Student Employment Services (NASES) Conference in July. For more information, head to www.nases.org.

If you’re a student, look at the hundreds of part-time on campus and off campus job roles advertised on UniHub. You could be the next SEOTY Awards winner!

If you’re an employer, you can benefit from flexible, casual workers and advertise for FREE today.

 

Top Tips for improving your performance with psychometric assessments

Featured

If you find the idea of completing online psychometric assessments daunting you’re not alone. Saqib Saddiq, Senior Psychologist at Graduates First shares his top tips for tackling psychometric tests:

  1. Start thinking about psychometric assessments well in advance so you have time to research the types of assessments you might be asked to complete and familiarise yourself with them. Many employers use the same test publishers to source their psychometric tests, so it’s worth spending time practicing to familiarise yourself with the types of psychometric tests and typical formats before you sit the assessments for real.
  2. Spend time practicing tests in advance. Most universities purchase packages to enable their students and graduates to practice online assessments under similar conditions to the real thing and receive detailed feedback so they can identify and work on areas for improvement. Along with Graduates First, (subscribed to by Sheffield Hallam University and other universities), other sites offering practice tests include CEBGlobal and Assessment Day.
  3. Find out which types of tests you’re likely to face with specific employers (for example look at the employer profiles on Graduates First), then spend time preparing for those specific tests. If you know you’ll be sitting a numerical reasoning test (tests your ability to reason with numerical information using basic arithmetic calculations) practice basic calculations in advance e.g. via BBC Bitesize. If you are expecting to take a situational judgement test or work personality questionnaires research the type of candidate the company is looking for and try to match your characteristics. When answering questions in the real assessment try to think of behaviours that a good candidate would demonstrate.
  4. Use practice tests to identify areas you can improve on, then work on improving your performance in those areas. If you find you struggle with accuracy, work on your concentration. If you run out of time you might need to take more practice tests and work on your speed.
  5. Realise that you’re not expected to finish the assessments –  they’re designed to stretch all candidates (meaning that no-one will reach the end). Stay calm and do your best – without getting upset if you do not manage to answer all questions. This is especially important if you are expected to go through a number of assessments in a row.
  6. Make sure you have the right conditions to maximise your performance completing the assessments use a PC or laptop in a quiet location where you won’t be disturbed etc. Make sure you have all the necessary items to hand before your start, such as a few sheets of paper, a pen and a calculator (if needed).

For more tips from myself and my colleagues at Graduates First, follow us on YouTube